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Fahrenholz rule

Overview page. Subjects: Genetics and Genomics.

The hypothesis that in groups of permanent parasites the classification of the parasites corresponds directly with the natural relationships of their hosts. For example, closely related...

See overview in Oxford Index

Fahrenholz rule

Overview page. Subjects: Genetics and Genomics.

The hypothesis that in groups of permanent parasites the classification of the parasites corresponds directly with the natural relationships of their hosts. For example, closely related...

See overview in Oxford Index

Fahrenholz's rule

Michael Allaby.

in A Dictionary of Ecology

January 2010; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Ecology and Conservation. 16 words.

The principle that the phylogenies of parasites and their hosts generally evolve in parallel.

Fahrenholz rule

Robert C. King, William D. Stansfield and Pamela K. Mulligan.

in A Dictionary of Genetics

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Genetics and Genomics. 119 words.

the hypothesis that in groups of permanent parasites the classification of the parasites corresponds directly with the natural relationships of

Fahrenholz rule

Robert C. King, Pamela K. Mulligan and William D. Stansfield.

in A Dictionary of Genetics

January 2013; p ublished online January 2014 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Genetics and Genomics. 119 words.

the hypothesis that in groups of permanent parasites, the classification of the parasites corresponds directly with the natural relationships of

Fahrenholz’s rule

Michael Allaby.

in A Dictionary of Ecology

P ublished online September 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Ecology and Conservation. 36 words.

The principle that the phylogenies of parasites and their hosts generally evolve in parallel, proposed in 1948 by the German zoologist ...

resource tracking

Overview page. Subjects: Genetics and Genomics.

A hypothesis involving host-parasite coevolution according to which ectoparasites track a particular resource, such as a type of skin, hair, or feathers. If in addition there is opportunity...

See overview in Oxford Index