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German law

Overview page. Subjects: Early Modern History (1500 to 1700).

Germany did not enjoy a national system of law until the German Empire, the Second Reich, emerged at the conclusion of the Franco-Prussian War in 1871. Even the Holy Roman ...

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German law

Edited by GORDON CAMPBELL.

in The Oxford Dictionary of the Renaissance

January 2003; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Early Modern History (1500 to 1700). 685 words.

Germany did not enjoy a national system of law until the German Empire, the Second Reich, emerged at the conclusion

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German law

Foster Nigel.

in The New Oxford Companion to Law

January 2008; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Law. 992 words.

The distinctive features of German law arise from comprehensive and rapid assimilation of Roman law in the middle ages, nineteenth‐century

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German law

Overview page. Subjects: Early Modern History (1500 to 1700).

Germany did not enjoy a national system of law until the German Empire, the Second Reich, emerged at the conclusion of the Franco-Prussian War in 1871. Even the Holy Roman ...

See overview in Oxford Index

Refugee Women under German Asylum Law

Birthe Ankenbrand.

in International Journal of Refugee Law

January 2002; p ublished online January 2002 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Human Rights and Immigration; Refugee Studies. 0 words.

In contrast to many Western countries, German asylum law has not yet been revised in order to recognize gender specific persecution. Although the issue of gender related persecution has been...

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German Wine Law

in The Oxford Companion to Wine

January 2015; p ublished online November 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Cookery, Food, and Drink. 691 words.

was once a source of pride for German wine producers but many now do their best to amend or ignore it. The German Wine Law of ...

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Do Criminal Complaints Make Sense in (German) International Criminal Law?

Thomas Beck and Christian Ritscher.

in Journal of International Criminal Justice

May 2015; p ublished online March 2015 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Criminal Law; International Law; International Criminal Law; International Humanitarian Law; Transnational Crime. 3078 words.

The authors discuss the relevance of complaints that non-governmental organizations (NGOs) can bring under German international criminal law. They argue that, due to the operation of...

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The New German Arbitration Law

in Arbitration International

March 1998; p ublished online December 2014 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Arbitration; Company and Commercial Law; Competition Law; Employment and Labour Law; Settlement of Disputes. 651 words.

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German Yearbook of International Law

Sienho Yee.

in Chinese Journal of International Law

June 2017; p ublished online June 2017 .

Journal Article. Subjects: International Law. 299 words.

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Comparative Law in the German Courts

Hannes Unberath and Astrid Stadler.

in Courts and Comparative Law

July 2015; p ublished online October 2015 .

Chapter. Subjects: Comparative Law; Constitutional and Administrative Law. 8236 words.

This chapter examines the specific problems of comparative law before German national courts. It focuses on areas in which comparative law has played a role in German private law. The first...

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The New German Law of Obligations

Reinhard Zimmermann.

November 2005; p ublished online March 2012 .

Book. Subjects: Civil Law. 256 pages.

On January 1, 2000, the German Civil Code (BGB) became 100 years old. It had been remarkably resilient throughout a century marked by catastrophic upheavals and a succession of...

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Part I Histories, Ch.3 Transformations of Natural Law: Germany 1648–1815

Martti Koskenniemi.

in The Oxford Handbook of the Theory of International Law

June 2016 .

Chapter. Subjects: Public International Law; International Law; Law. 23 pages. 11321 words.

This chapter examines the transformation of ideas about international power that took place in the idiom of natural law between 1648 and 1815, a key period of early Western modernity....

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To what extent should arbitrators respect domestic case law? The German experience regarding the Law on Standard Terms

Klaus Peter Berger.

in Arbitration International

June 2016; p ublished online December 2015 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Arbitration; Company and Commercial Law; Competition Law; Employment and Labour Law; Settlement of Disputes. 8835 words.

International arbitrators are often confronted with the question of whether they should follow the case law of domestic courts of the jurisdiction whose law applies to the contract before...

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Hierarchical Authority in German Constitutional Law

Michaela Hailbronner.

in Traditions and Transformations

October 2015; p ublished online December 2015 .

Chapter. Subjects: Constitutional and Administrative Law. 11576 words.

This chapter takes a closer look at the foundations of judicial authority in German legal culture. German law shares in the long-standing continental European understanding of law as a...

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Competition Law and Germany’s Social Market Economy

DAVID J. GERBER.

in Law and Competition in Twentieth-Century Europe

March 2001; p ublished online January 2010 .

Chapter. Subjects: Competition Law. 31570 words.

Most European countries reacted to postwar conditions by creating competition law systems that were, at least initially, little more than minor components of economic policy. This chapter...

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The German Law of Unjustified Enrichment and Restitution

Gerhard Dannemann.

July 2009; p ublished online September 2009 .

Book. Subjects: Comparative Law. 352 pages.

This book provides a description of the German law of unjustified enrichment. It explains how German law generally allows restitution for transfers made without legal ground (rather than on...

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Concepts of Intention in German Criminal Law

Greg Taylor.

in Oxford Journal of Legal Studies

January 2004; p ublished online January 2004 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Law. 0 words.

In German criminal law, intention is the label used not only for cases of knowledge and desire; it also includes cases of what the common law would call recklessness. German criminal law...

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Motifs in Modern German Protestant Theologies of Law

Bradley Shingleton.

in Oxford Journal of Law and Religion

October 2013; p ublished online June 2013 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Religion; Law. 13816 words.

This article provides an overview of a distinct tradition of theological reflection on positive law constituted by contemporary German Protestantism. Participants in that tradition have...

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Landmark in German abortion Law: The German 1995 Compromise Compared with English Law

Christina P. Schlegel.

in International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family

April 1997; p ublished online April 1997 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Family Law; Marriage and the Family. 0 words.

A new era in Germany's abortion legislation was inaugurated with the Pregnant Women's and Families' Aid Amendment Act (Schwangeren- und Familienhilfednderungsgesetz),' which came into force...

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The Many Fields of (German) International Law

Nico Krisch.

in Comparative International Law

January 2018; p ublished online January 2018 .

Chapter. Subjects: Public International Law; Comparative Law. 9180 words.

In recent years, interest in comparative approaches in the study of international law has grown. This chapter contributes to this endeavor with a focus on the particularities of academic...

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German Judicial Acceptance of European Law Supremacy

KAREN J. ALTER.

in Establishing the Supremacy of European Law

January 2003; p ublished online January 2010 .

Chapter. Subjects: Comparative Law. 26054 words.

Germany is a clear example of how judicial rivalries and divergent judicial preferences regarding European legal issues have shaped the process of doctrinal change. Divergent preferences...

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