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San-lun

Overview page. Subjects: Buddhism.

School of the Three Treatises, established in China by Kumārajīva (344–413 ce), the Kuchean monk who translated the three treatises—Treatise on the Middle, Treatise on the Twelve Gates,...

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San-lun

Damien Keown.

in A Dictionary of Buddhism

January 2004; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Buddhism. 439 words.

(Chin.). An early school of Buddhism in China. The name means ‘Three Treatises’, and refers to the school's focus

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San-lun

Overview page. Subjects: Buddhism.

School of the Three Treatises, established in China by Kumārajīva (344–413 ce), the Kuchean monk who translated the three treatises—Treatise on the Middle, Treatise on the Twelve Gates,...

See overview in Oxford Index

San-lun

John Bowker.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

January 2000; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Religious Studies. 71 words.

School of the Three Treatises, established in China by Kumārajīva (344–413 ce), the Kuchean monk who translated the

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San lun xuanyi (J.)

Edited by Robert E. Buswell and David S. Lopez.

in The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism

P ublished online July 2017 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Buddhism. 197 words.

In Chinese, “Profound Meaning of the Three Treatises,” composed by the monk Jizang sometime around 597. Although the title

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San lun zong (J.)

Edited by Robert E. Buswell and David S. Lopez.

in The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism

P ublished online July 2017 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Buddhism. 355 words.

In Chinese, the “Three Treatises school,” a Chinese analogue of the Madhyamaka school of Indian Buddhism philosophy; a largely exegetical

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Fa-lang (507–81)

Damien Keown.

in A Dictionary of Buddhism

January 2004; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Buddhism. 32 words.

(507–81).

Chinese master of the San-lun school ordained in 528 ce. His exposition of the San-lun teachings

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Chi-tsang

Overview page. Subjects: Buddhism.

(549–623).

Buddhist teacher of the San-lun school, who wrote many commentaries on Sūtras and Mahāyāna texts. Of immense importance in the development of San-lun (Chin. for...

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Fa-lang

Overview page. Subjects: Buddhism.

(507–81).

Chinese master of the San-lun school ordained in 528 ce. His exposition of the San-lun teachings met with great success and his work was continued by his student...

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Seng-chao (374–414)

Damien Keown.

in A Dictionary of Buddhism

January 2004; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Buddhism. 92 words.

(374–414).

A second-generation master of the San-lun school in early Chinese Buddhism. He was one of the

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Chi-tsang (549–623)

Damien Keown.

in A Dictionary of Buddhism

January 2004; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Buddhism. 231 words.

(549–623).

The greatest systematizer of the San-lun school in China, and ironically, its last great master. The

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Dasheng xuanlun (J.)

Edited by Robert E. Buswell and David S. Lopez.

in The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism

P ublished online July 2017 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Buddhism. 105 words.

In Chinese, “Profound Treatise on the Mahāyāna”; one of most influential treatises of the San lun zong, the

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Zhongguan lun shu (J.)

Edited by Robert E. Buswell and David S. Lopez.

in The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism

P ublished online July 2017 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Buddhism. 135 words.

In Chinese, “Commentary on the Mūlamadhyamakakārikā”; composed by the Chinese San lun zong monk Jizang in 608. Jizang

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Yōkan (1032–1111)

Edited by Robert E. Buswell and David S. Lopez.

in The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism

P ublished online July 2017 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Buddhism. 119 words.

Japanese vinaya master of the Sanronshū (C. San lun zong); also known as Eikan. Yōkan wrote two important

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Jizang (J.)

Edited by Robert E. Buswell and David S. Lopez.

in The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism

P ublished online July 2017 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Buddhism. 284 words.

In Chinese, “Storehouse of Auspiciousness”; Chinese Buddhist monk of originally Parthian descent and exegete within the San lun zong

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Six Schools of Nara Buddhism

Damien Keown.

in A Dictionary of Buddhism

January 2004; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Buddhism. 77 words.

Six Buddhist schools which developed in Japan during the Nara period. (1) The Sanron school focused on San-lun teachings; (2)

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Fa-lang (507–81)

John Bowker.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

January 2000; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Religious Studies. 36 words.

(507–81).

San-lun Buddhist teacher. He devoted himself to combining in practice Vinaya rules and dhyāna meditation. In 558

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Chi-tsang (549–623)

John Bowker.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

January 2000; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Religious Studies. 44 words.

(549–623).

Buddhist teacher of the San-lun school, who wrote many commentaries on Sūtras and Mahāyāna texts. Of immense

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Mādhyamaka

John Bowker.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

January 2000; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Religious Studies. 628 words.

(‘middle way’; Chin., San-lun; Jap., Sanron; Korean, Samnon).

The ‘Middle School’, a system of Buddhist philosophy founded by

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Six Schools of Nara Buddhism

Overview page. Subjects: Buddhism.

Six Buddhist schools which developed in Japan during the Nara period. (1) The Sanron school focused on San-lun teachings; (2) the Kegon school took up Hua-yen studies; (3) the Ritsu school...

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Sanron

Overview page. Subjects: Buddhism.

(Jap.). One of the Six Schools of Nara Buddhism during the early history of Buddhism in Japan. The word is a Japanese pronunciation of the Chinese ‘San-lun’, and represented an effort to...

See overview in Oxford Index