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Vedic Cosmogony

Overview page. Subjects: Religion.

At the center of Vedic creation as expressed particularly in the ṛg Veda (see ṛg Veda) is the idea of creation as separation, or sacrifice, which leads to the ordering of chaos. Incest...

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Vedic Cosmogony

Overview page. Subjects: Religion.

At the center of Vedic creation as expressed particularly in the ṛg Veda (see ṛg Veda) is the idea of creation as separation, or sacrifice, which leads to the ordering of chaos. Incest...

See overview in Oxford Index

Vedic Cosmogony

David Leeming.

in A Dictionary of Asian Mythology

January 2001; p ublished online January 2002 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 517 words.

At the center of Vedic creation as expressed particularly in the ṛg Veda (see ṛg Veda) is the

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Indian Cosmogony

David Leeming.

in A Dictionary of Asian Mythology

January 2001; p ublished online January 2002 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 19 words.

see Vedic Cosmogony, Laws of Manu, Prajāpati, Puruṣa, Brahmā, Viṣṇu Purāṇa Creation, Hinduism,

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Ananta

David Leeming.

in A Dictionary of Asian Mythology

January 2001; p ublished online January 2002 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 28 words.

The serpent Ananta, or Śeṣa, on whom the Hindu god Viṣṇu (see Viṣṇu, see Vedic cosmogony) sleeps,

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Ananta

David Leeming.

in The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

January 2005; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 26 words.

The serpent Ananta, or Shesha, on whom the god Vishnu sleeps in Indian Vedic cosmogony, represents eternity or infinity. Sometimes

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Cosmogony

Alf Hiltebeitel.

in Hinduism

P ublished online January 2011 .

Article. Subjects: Hinduism. 8259 words.

Hinduism has numerous cosmogonies and no single or standard cosmogony. Earlier cosmogonies tend to supply pieces of later ones, which tend to emerge along with new movements and the textual...

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Creation

David Leeming.

in Myth

November 2001; p ublished online November 2003 .

Chapter. Subjects: Religious Studies. 8778 words.

Creation myths from several traditions – Zuni, Vedic, Christian, and Icelandic, for example – reveal several ways by which humans through the ages have attempted to identify themselves...

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Puranic Cosmogony

Overview page. Subjects: Religion.

In the Purāṇas (see Purāṇas) of Vedism (see Vedic entries), two essential creation myths are developed from the myths of the sacred revealed, or Śruti (see Śruti) tradition. In the first...

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Kāma and Kāmaśāstra

Lee Siegel.

in Hinduism

P ublished online January 2011 .

Article. Subjects: Hinduism. 5389 words.

The term kāma comes from the verbal root kam, meaning “to love, be in love with, or have sexual intercourse with.” in its earliest usages it designated any “desire, wish, drive, or urge,”...

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Trimūrti

Greg Bailey.

in Hinduism

P ublished online January 2011 .

Article. Subjects: Hinduism. 3664 words.

The trimūrti is a theological grouping of three gods in Sanskrit literature bringing together Brahma, Vishnu, and Shiva into a role-oriented scheme where each is said to be responsible for...

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