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Abduction

Overview page. Subjects: Religion.

The abduction motif in myth usually involves the malicious capture of a girl or young woman by an evil force or lustful deity or hero. In Greek mythology Persephone is ...

See overview in Oxford Index

abduct

Edited by T. F. Hoad.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

January 1996; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 18 words.

XIX. f. abduct-, pp. stem of L. abdūcere, f. AB- + dūcere lead, carry.

So abduction XVII.

abduction

Overview page. Subjects: Law.

N.

Wrongfully taking away or detaining another person, usually by force or fraud. See child abduction; false imprisonment; kidnapping.

See overview in Oxford Index

abductor

Overview page. Subjects: Medicine and Health — Biological Sciences.

A type of muscle whose function is to move a limb away from the body. Abductors work antagonistically with adductors.

See overview in Oxford Index

abductor

Elizabeth Martin and Robert Hine.

in A Dictionary of Biology

January 2008; p ublished online January 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Biological Sciences. 22 words.

A type of muscle whose function is to move a limb away from the body. Abductors work antagonistically with adductors

abductor

Edited by Elizabeth Martin and Robert Hine.

in A Dictionary of Biology

June 2016; p ublished online September 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Biological Sciences. 25 words.

A type of muscle whose function is to move a limb away from the body. Abductors work antagonistically with *...

abductor

Edited by Robert Hine.

in A Dictionary of Biology

April 2019; p ublished online April 2019 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Biological Sciences. 25 words.

A type of muscle whose function is to move a limb away from the body. Abductors work antagonistically with *...

abduction

Jonathan Law and Elizabeth A. Martin.

in A Dictionary of Law

P ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Law. 20 words.

n.

Wrongfully taking away or detaining another person, usually by force or fraud. See child abduction; false imprisonment;

abduction

Edited by Jonathan Law.

in A Dictionary of Law

June 2018; p ublished online June 2018 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Law. 20 words.

Wrongfully taking away or detaining another person, usually by force or fraud. See child abduction; false imprisonment; kidnapping.

abduction

Graham Gooch and Michael Williams.

in A Dictionary of Law Enforcement

P ublished online January 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Policing. 142 words.

1 Wrongfully taking away or detaining another person, usually by force or fraud. See also child abduction; false imprisonment

abduction

Graham Gooch and Michael Williams.

in A Dictionary of Law Enforcement

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Policing. 187 words.

1 The wrongful taking away of a person. The offences connected with the abduction of women contained within the Sexual

abduction

Edited by Trischa Mann.

in Australian Law Dictionary

January 2013; p ublished online April 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Law. 111 words.

(1) Abductive reasoning, ‘inference to the best explanation’. Inferential reasoning that starts with a set of accepted facts and infers

abduction

Edited by Trischa Mann.

in Australian Law Dictionary

October 2017; p ublished online April 2018 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Law. 118 words.

(1) Abductive reasoning, ‘inference to the best explanation’. Inferential reasoning that starts with a set of accepted facts and infers

abduct

in Concise Medical Dictionary

January 2010; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Medicine and Health. 19 words.

vb. to move a limb or any other part away from the midline of the body. —abduction n.

abduction

Régine le Jan.

in Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages

January 2002; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500). 428 words.

All the Germanic laws condemned the abduction of young girls, widows and nuns. Certain laws imposed separation, or else

abduction

C. J. Hookway.

in The Oxford Companion to Philosophy

January 2005; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Philosophy. 154 words.

Abductive reasoning accepts a conclusion on the grounds that it explains the available evidence. The term was introduced by Charles

Abduction

David Leeming.

in The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

January 2005; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 185 words.

The abduction motif in myth usually involves the malicious capture of a girl or young woman by an evil force

Abduction

John Kaag.

in Thinking Through the Imagination

February 2014; p ublished online September 2014 .

Chapter. Subjects: Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art. 6457 words.

This chapter focuses the relationship between Peircean abduction and the concepts of the imagination and genius in German idealism. It asks the following questions: What is abduction? Can...

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Abduction

Philippe Lorino.

in Pragmatism and Organization Studies

February 2018; p ublished online March 2018 .

Chapter. Subjects: Organizational Theory and Behaviour. 14544 words.

Abduction was introduced by Peirce, first as an abstract logical concept, and secondly as an epistemological model, the first step of inquiry: hypothesizing. In response to doubt, abduction...

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abduction

Edited by John P. Grant and J. Craig Barker.

in Encyclopaedic Dictionary of International Law

January 2009; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: International Law. 149 words.

The Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction of 25 October 1980 (1343 U.N.T.S. 97)

abduction

P. H. Matthews.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Linguistics

January 2014; p ublished online May 2014 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Linguistics. 24 words.

Movement away from a central line. The *vocal cords are thus abducted when they are drawn apart. The opposite of adduction....