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anaphora

Overview page. Subjects: Arts and Humanities.

Anaphora in general is used of coreferential relations, where one element in a sentence takes its meaning or reference from another. In ‘John said that it would rain, but I don't believe...

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anaphora

Edited by T. F. Hoad.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

January 1996; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 25 words.

(rhet.) repetition XVI; (liturg.) Eucharistic canon XVIII. — L. — Gr. anaphorā́ carrying back, f. anaphérein carry up or back,

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anaphora

Simon Blackburn.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy

January 2016; p ublished online March 2016 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Philosophy. 100 words.

Anaphora in general is used of coreferential relations, where one element in a sentence takes its meaning or reference from

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anaphora

Simon Blackburn.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy

January 2008; p ublished online January 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Philosophy. 100 words.

Anaphora in general is used of coreferential relations, where one element in a sentence takes its meaning or reference from

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Anaphora

in The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics

P ublished online August 2017 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (Poetry and Poets). 531 words.

Anaphora (or epanaphora) is the *repetition of the same word or words at the beginning of successive phrases,

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Anaphora

Eric Reuland, Martin Everaert and Anna Volkova.

in Linguistics

P ublished online October 2011 .

Article. Subjects: Linguistics; Anthropological Linguistics; Language Families; Psycholinguistics; Sociolinguistics. 8824 words.

Anaphora can be generally defined as “subsequent reference to an entity already introduced in discourse” (Safir 2004a; see Representing Anaphoric Dependencies). The study of anaphora spans...

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anaphora

Overview page. Subjects: Arts and Humanities.

Anaphora in general is used of coreferential relations, where one element in a sentence takes its meaning or reference from another. In ‘John said that it would rain, but I don't believe...

See overview in Oxford Index

retrospective anaphora

P. H. Matthews.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Linguistics

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Linguistics. 12 words.

Anaphora in relation to a unit earlier: i.e. not ‘anticipatory’.

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retrospective anaphora

P. H. Matthews.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Linguistics

January 2014; p ublished online May 2014 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Linguistics. 13 words.

*Anaphora in relation to a unit earlier: i.e. not ‘anticipatory’.

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Anaphora Resolution

Ruslan Mitkov.

in The Oxford Handbook of Computational Linguistics

January 2005; p ublished online September 2012 .

Article. Subjects: Computational Linguistics. 7375 words.

The article provides a theoretical background of anaphora and introduces the task of anaphora resolution. The importance of anaphora resolution in natural language parsing (NLP) is...

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zero anaphora

P. H. Matthews.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Linguistics

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Linguistics. 116 words.

Relation in which a phonetically null element is seen as linked by anaphora to an antecedent.

Thus, in English, an

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zero anaphora

P. H. Matthews.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Linguistics

January 2014; p ublished online May 2014 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Linguistics. 121 words.

Relation in which a phonetically *null element is seen as linked by *anaphora to an antecedent.

Thus, in English, an element such as ...

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Pronominal Anaphora

Karen Van Hoek.

in The Oxford Handbook of Cognitive Linguistics

June 2010; p ublished online September 2012 .

Article. Subjects: Linguistics; Grammar, Syntax and Morphology. 10251 words.

The theory of cognitive grammar, developed by Ron Langacker, assumes that there are in fact only three kinds of linguistic units: semantic, phonological, and symbolic, where a symbolic unit...

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Primary and donkey anaphora

Pieter A. M. Seuren.

in The Logic of Language

October 2009; p ublished online February 2010 .

Chapter. Subjects: Semantics. 11266 words.

Anaphora is more than the replacement of a lexical NP by a pronoun. Anaphora resolution may require an analysis in terms of the language of quantification. Some anaphors (the ‘donkey’...

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Complement Anaphora and Interpretation

Rick Nouwen.

in Journal of Semantics

February 2003; p ublished online February 2003 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Semantics. 0 words.

Quantificational sentences D(A)(B) allow for subsequent plural anaphoric reference to three sets associated with them: the maximal set A, the reference set AB and, sometimes, the...

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Presupposition and Anaphora

Ernie Lepore and Matthew Stone.

in Imagination and Convention

December 2014; p ublished online March 2015 .

Chapter. Subjects: Philosophy of Language. 5083 words.

This chapter explores an important class of interpretive dependencies often attributed to general pragmatic principles: temporal connections between successive sentences in narrative...

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Anaphora and Semantic Innocence

J. P. Smit and Asbjørn Steglich-Petersen.

in Journal of Semantics

February 2010; p ublished online November 2009 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Semantics. 2101 words.

Semantic theories that violate semantic innocence, that is require reference shifts when terms are embedded in ‘that’ clauses and the like, are often challenged by producing sentences where...

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Quantification and Pronominal Anaphora

Mark Steedman.

in Taking Scope

November 2011; p ublished online August 2013 .

Chapter. Subjects: Semantics. 5638 words.

Type raising, a rule of the Combinatory Categorial Grammar (CCG) lexicon, is the operation used by Richard Montague in 1973 in semantics to treat quantification in natural language and...

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The Syntax of Anaphora

Ken Safir.

February 2004; p ublished online September 2007 .

Book. Subjects: Grammar, Syntax and Morphology. 0 pages.

This book establishes the need for a competitive approach to the distribution and interpretation of anaphoric relations in natural language, and makes a particular proposal about the sort...

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Anaphora

Overview page. Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500).

The name used in the E. Church of the central prayer in the Eucharistic liturgy, known in the W. as the Eucharistic Prayer (q.v.).

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anaphora

Ian Buchanan.

in A Dictionary of Critical Theory

January 2010; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Theory and Cultural Studies. 116 words.

A means of linking two sentences, paragraphs, or indeed thoughts, by means of a repetition of a part of the

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