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autonomy

Overview page.

Free will; self-governing, ability of a person or a group to choose a course of action. Autonomy is a basic human right and is one of the principles of bioethics.

See overview in Oxford Index

Autonomy

in Encyclopedia of Aesthetics

January 2014; p ublished online August 2014 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art. 15347 words.

To explain the philosophical concept of autonomy (i.e., self-legislation or freedom), this entry comprises four essays: Overview Critique of Autonomy

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autonomic

Michael Allaby.

in A Dictionary of Ecology

P ublished online September 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Ecology and Conservation. 37 words.

Applied to behavioural responses (e.g. pallor and sweating in humans in response to fear) that are produced by the autonomic nervous system. Certain ritualized forms of behaviour used in...

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autonomy

Edited by John P. Grant and J. Craig Barker.

in Encyclopaedic Dictionary of International Law

January 2009; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: International Law. 369 words.

While ‘autonomy’ is not strictly a term of art under international law, it is widely used in the literature of

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autonomy

Gerald Dworkin.

in The New Oxford Companion to Law

January 2008; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Law. 1069 words.

The concept of autonomy has assumed increasing importance in contemporary political and legal philosophy. Philosophers such as John Rawls,

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Autonomy

in The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics

P ublished online August 2017 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (Poetry and Poets). 2534 words.

The concept of autonomy is fundamental for poetics because it has been frequently invoked to sustain two claims about works

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Autonomy

Linda Trinkaus Zagzebski.

in Epistemic Authority

November 2012; p ublished online January 2013 .

Chapter. Subjects: Metaphysics. 11230 words.

This chapter argues that a view of autonomy is a consequence of the line of argument of the book. The norm of autonomy is conscientious self-reflection. Since belief on authority is...

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autonomic

Michael Allaby.

in A Dictionary of Ecology

January 2010; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Ecology and Conservation. 37 words.

Applied to behavioural responses (e.g. pallor and sweating in humans in response to fear) that are produced by the autonomic

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autonomy

Gabriele Griffin.

in A Dictionary of Gender Studies

P ublished online July 2017 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Gender and Sexuality. 152 words.

A concept used in political theory and philosophy to describe a person’s right to self-government, free from external influence. Autonomy

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autonomy

Tony Harcup.

in A Dictionary of Journalism

January 2014; p ublished online September 2014 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Media Studies. 135 words.

The freedom to work without being directly controlled, censored, or micro-managed. Within journalism the concept of autonomy may refer to

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autonomy

Miquel Porta and John M. Last.

in A Dictionary of Public Health

P ublished online May 2018 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Medicine and Health. 31 words.

Free will; self-governing ability of a person or a group to choose a course of action. Autonomy is a basic

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autonomy

Edited by John M. Last.

in A Dictionary of Public Health

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Public Health and Epidemiology. 31 words.

Free will; self-governing, ability of a person or a group to choose a course of action. Autonomy is a basic

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autonomic

Michael Allaby.

in A Dictionary of Zoology

January 2009; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Zoology and Animal Sciences. 37 words.

Applied to behavioural responses (e.g. pallor and sweating in humans in response to fear) that are produced by the autonomic

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Autonomy

Robert M. Veatch, Amy Haddad and E. J. Last.

in Case Studies in Pharmacy Ethics

April 2017; p ublished online May 2017 .

Chapter. Subjects: Pharmacology. 8211 words.

This chapter explores the basic ethical principle of autonomy and the related principles of veracity, fidelity, and avoidance of killing. The pharmacist’s role in recognizing and respecting...

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autonomy

Edited by Craig Calhoun.

in Dictionary of the Social Sciences

January 2002; p ublished online January 2002 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Social Sciences. 160 words.

Self-rule or self-determination. In politics, autonomy generally refers to the right or ability of a group or institution to govern

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Autonomy

Casey Haskins, Peter Bürger, Mary Devereaux and K. Michael Hays.

in Encyclopedia of Aesthetics

January 1998; p ublished online January 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art. 14666 words.

To explain the philosophical concept of autonomy (that is, self-legislation or freedom), this entry comprises four essays: Historical Overview Critique

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Autonomy

Jennifer M. Denbow.

in Governed through Choice

August 2015; p ublished online September 2016 .

Chapter. Subjects: US Politics. 13524 words.

Chapter 1 investigates different theoretical understandings of autonomy. It traces the tension between autonomy operating at once as both a liberating and exclusionary idea, as well as the...

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Autonomy

Nigel Nicholson and Nathan R. Selden.

in The Rhetoric of Medicine

April 2019; p ublished online April 2019 .

Chapter. Subjects: History of Medicine; Clinical Medicine. 12428 words.

Chapter 5 explores an idea central to the medical profession, that a physician should be an autonomous agent. In the archaic and early classical period, physicians faced being associated...

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autonomy

Overview page.

Free will; self-governing, ability of a person or a group to choose a course of action. Autonomy is a basic human right and is one of the principles of bioethics.

See overview in Oxford Index

Autonomy

John Christman.

in The Oxford Handbook of the History of Ethics

January 2013; p ublished online April 2013 .

Article. Subjects: Philosophy; Moral Philosophy. 9890 words.

To be autonomous is to be governed in one's actions (or life as a whole) by values, principles, or reflections that are truly one's own, to be one's own person, as opposed to being guided...

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Autonomy

James Griffin.

in On Human Rights

February 2008; p ublished online May 2010 .

Chapter. Subjects: Moral Philosophy. 4222 words.

According to the personhood account, human rights are protections of our normative agency. Normative agency has stages. The first stage is autonomy, which consists in our assessing options...

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