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coffee, Decaffeinated

Overview page. Subjects: Medicine and Health.

Coffee beans (or instant coffee) from which the caffeine has been extracted with solvent (e.g. methylene or ethylene chloride), carbon dioxide under pressure (supercritical CO2), or water....

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coffee, Decaffeinated

Overview page. Subjects: Medicine and Health.

Coffee beans (or instant coffee) from which the caffeine has been extracted with solvent (e.g. methylene or ethylene chloride), carbon dioxide under pressure (supercritical CO2), or water....

See overview in Oxford Index

Caffeine Content of Decaffeinated Coffee

Rachel R. McCusker, Brian Fuehrlein, Bruce A. Goldberger, Mark S. Gold and Edward J. Cone.

in Journal of Analytical Toxicology

October 2006; p ublished online October 2006 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Medical Toxicology; Toxicology (Non-medical). 0 words.

Caffeine is the most widely consumed drug in the world with coffee representing a major source of intake. Despite widespread availability, various medical conditions necessitate...

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coffee, decaffeinated

David A. Bender.

in A Dictionary of Food and Nutrition

January 2009; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Cookery, Food, and Drink. 40 words.

Coffee beans (or instant coffee) from which the caffeine has been extracted with solvent (e.g. methylene or ethylene chloride), carbon

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coffee, decaffeinated

David A. Bender.

in A Dictionary of Food and Nutrition

P ublished online January 2014 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Cookery, Food, and Drink. 40 words.

Coffee beans (or instant coffee) from which the caffeine has been extracted with solvent (e.g. methylene or ethylene chloride), carbon

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Coffee, Decaffeinated

Mark Pendergrast.

in The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America

January 2004; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Cookery, Food, and Drink. 429 words.

From its earliest history, there were health concerns regarding coffee and its effects. In 1511 the Arab governor of Mecca

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Caffeine Content of Specialty Coffees

Rachel R. McCusker, Bruce A. Goldberger and Edward J. Cone.

in Journal of Analytical Toxicology

October 2003; p ublished online October 2003 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Medical Toxicology; Toxicology (Non-medical). 0 words.

Caffeine is the world's most widely consumed drug with its main source found in coffee. We evaluated the caffeine content of caffeinated and decaffeinated specialty coffee samples obtained...

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Coffee and Tea Intake and the Risk of Myocardial Infarction

Howard D. Sesso, J. Michael Gaziano, Julie E. Buring and Charles H. Hennekens.

in American Journal of Epidemiology

January 1999; p ublished online January 1999 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Public Health and Epidemiology. 0 words.

The authors investigated the association of caffeinated coffee, decaffeinated coffee, and tea with myocardial infarction in a study of 340 cases and age-, sex-, and community-matched...

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Coffee, Tea, and Fatal Oral/Pharyngeal Cancer in a Large Prospective US Cohort

Janet S. Hildebrand, Alpa V. Patel, Marjorie L. McCullough, Mia M. Gaudet, Amy Y. Chen, Richard B. Hayes and Susan M. Gapstur.

in American Journal of Epidemiology

January 2013; p ublished online December 2012 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Public Health and Epidemiology. 4426 words.

Epidemiologic studies suggest that coffee intake is associated with reduced risk of oral/pharyngeal cancer. The authors examined associations of caffeinated coffee, decaffeinated coffee,...

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Coffee, Tea, and Caffeine Consumption and Incidence of Colon and Rectal Cancer

Karin B. Michels, Walter C. Willett, Charles S. Fuchs and Edward Giovannucci.

in JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute

February 2005; p ublished online February 2005 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Medical Oncology. 7409 words.

Background: Frequent coffee consumption has been associated with a reduced risk of colorectal cancer in a number of case–control studies. Cohort studies have not revealed such...

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Coffee Consumption and Cognitive Function among Older Adults

Marilyn Johnson-Kozlow, Donna Kritz-Silverstein, Elizabeth Barrett-Connor and Deborah Morton.

in American Journal of Epidemiology

November 2002; p ublished online November 2002 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Public Health and Epidemiology. 6550 words.

This study examined the association of caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee intake with cognitive function in a community-based sample of older adults in 1988–1992. Participants were 890...

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Coffee Consumption and Prostate Cancer Risk and Progression in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study

Kathryn M. Wilson, Julie L. Kasperzyk, Jennifer R. Rider, Stacey Kenfield, Rob M. van Dam, Meir J. Stampfer, Edward Giovannucci and Lorelei A. Mucci.

in JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute

June 2011; p ublished online May 2011 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Medical Oncology. 6974 words.

Background

Coffee contains many biologically active compounds, including caffeine and phenolic acids, that have potent antioxidant activity and can affect...

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Coffee Intake and Incidence of Erectile Dysfunction

David S Lopez, Lydia Liu, Eric B Rimm, Konstantinos K Tsilidis, Marcia de Oliveira Otto, Run Wang, Steven Canfield and Edward Giovannucci.

in American Journal of Epidemiology

May 2018; p ublished online August 2017 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Public Health and Epidemiology. 4861 words.

Abstract

Coffee intake is suggested to have a positive impact on chronic diseases, yet its role in urological diseases such as erectile dysfunction (ED)...

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Role of coffee in modulation of diabetes risk

Fausta Natella and Cristina Scaccini.

in Nutrition Reviews

April 2012; p ublished online October 2014 .

Journal Article. 7969 words.

Coffee consumption has been associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes. This association does not depend on race, gender, geographic distribution of the study populations, or the type...

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Randomized control trial investigating the influence of coffee on heart rate variability in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction

T. Richardson, J. Baker, P.W. Thomas, C. Meckes, A. Rozkovec and D. Kerr.

in QJM: An International Journal of Medicine

August 2009; p ublished online June 2009 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Medicine and Health. 2971 words.

Background: Cardiac autonomic dysfunction post ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) has been linked to an excess risk of premature cardiovascular morbidity and...

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Pregnancy Hormone Metabolite Patterns, Pregnancy Symptoms, and Coffee Consumption

Christina C. Lawson, Grace K. LeMasters, Linda S. Levin and James H. Liu.

in American Journal of Epidemiology

September 2002; p ublished online September 2002 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Public Health and Epidemiology. 5957 words.

Because of contradictory reports of pregnancy outcomes and coffee intake, this study was designed to determine how hormone metabolite levels, symptoms, and coffee consumption patterns are...

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Coffee consumption and risk of hospitalized miscarriage before 12 weeks of gestation.

F Parazzini, L Chatenoud, E Di Cintio, R Mezzopane, M Surace, G Zanconato, L Fedele and G Benzi.

in Human Reproduction

August 1998; p ublished online August 1998 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Reproductive Medicine. 0 words.

In order to analyse the association between drinking coffee in pregnancy and risk of spontaneous abortion, a case-controlled study was conducted in Milan, Northern Italy. Cases were 782...

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Coffee consumption and incidence of lung cancer in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study

Kristin A Guertin, Neal D Freedman, Erikka Loftfield, Barry I Graubard, Neil E Caporaso and Rashmi Sinha.

in International Journal of Epidemiology

June 2016; p ublished online June 2015 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Public Health and Epidemiology. 6655 words.

Background: Coffee drinkers had a higher risk of lung cancer in some previous studies, but as heavy coffee drinkers tend to also be cigarette smokers, such findings could be...

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Coffee Drinking and Cutaneous Melanoma Risk in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study

Erikka Loftfield, Neal D. Freedman, Barry I. Graubard, Albert R. Hollenbeck, Fatma M. Shebl, Susan T. Mayne and Rashmi Sinha.

in JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute

P ublished online January 2015 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Medical Oncology. 6861 words.

Background:

Cutaneous melanoma is the fifth most common cancer in the United States. Modifiable risk factors, with the exception of exposure to ultraviolet...

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Analysis of Total Caffeine and Other Xanthines in Specialty Coffees Using Mixed Mode Solid-Phase Extraction and Liquid Chromatography-Diode-Array Detection After Microwave Digestion

Jeffery Hackett, Michael J. Telepchak and Michael J. Coyer.

in Journal of Analytical Toxicology

October 2008; p ublished online October 2008 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Medical Toxicology; Toxicology (Non-medical). 0 words.

In this study, solid-phase extraction (SPE) in mixed mode operation was employed to isolate xanthines including caffeine and theobromine from milled caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee...

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A functional role for the colleters of coffee flowers

Juliana Lischka Sampaio Mayer, Sandra Maria Carmello-Guerreiro and Paulo Mazzafera.

in AoB PLANTS

January 2013; p ublished online July 2013 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Plant Sciences and Forestry. 5188 words.

Colleters are protuberances or trichomes that produce and release an exudate that overlays vegetative or reproductive buds. Colleters have a functional definition, as they are thought to...

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