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cope

Overview page. Subjects: Christianity — Art.

A semicircular cloak worn at certain liturgical functions in the W. Church when the chasuble is not used. In the Middle Ages it was widely used as a ceremonial choir habit by communities on...

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cope

Edited by T. F. Hoad.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

January 1996; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 35 words.

†come to blows (with) XIV; meet or contend with XVI. — OF. coper, var. of colper (mod.

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Cope

Edited by Patrick Hanks.

in Dictionary of American Family Names

January 2003; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Names Studies. 48 words.

English (common in the Midlands): from Middle English cope ‘cloak’, ‘cape’ (from Old English cāp reinforced by the Old Norse

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Copes

Edited by Patrick Hanks.

in Dictionary of American Family Names

January 2003; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Names Studies. 19 words.

Probably a variant of Cope or an Americanized spelling of Dutch Koppes or German and Dutch Kops.

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coper

in New Oxford Rhyming Dictionary

January 2012; p ublished online May 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 77 words.

coper, doper, eloper, Europa, groper, hoper, L-dopa, moper, no-hoper, opah, toper • interloper • blooper, cooper, Cowper,

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cope

in New Oxford Rhyming Dictionary

January 2012; p ublished online May 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 70 words.

aslope, cope, dope, elope, grope, hope, interlope, lope, mope, nope, ope, pope, rope, scope, slope, soap, taupe, tope,

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coper

in Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 77 words.

coper, doper, eloper, Europa, groper, hoper, L-dopa, moper, no-hoper, opah, toper • interloper • blooper, cooper, Cowper,

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cope

in Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 70 words.

aslope, cope, dope, elope, grope, hope, interlope, lope, mope, nope, ope, pope, rope, scope, slope, soap, taupe, tope,

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cope

Edited by Jeremy Butterfield.

in Fowler’s Concise Dictionary of Modern English Usage

January 2016; p ublished online September 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 64 words.

The traditional construction followed by with has been in common use since the 16c: Like many religious professionals, I cope

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cope

Edited by Jeremy Butterfield.

in Fowler’s Dictionary of Modern English Usage

January 2015; p ublished online June 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 130 words.

The traditional construction with with has been in common use since the 16c.: e.g. His being too unwell to cope with Dr. Johnson...

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cope

Edited by Robert Allen.

in Pocket Fowler's Modern English Usage

January 2008; p ublished online January 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 64 words.

The traditional construction followed by with has been in common use since the 16c: Like many religious professionals, I cope

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cope

Julia Cresswell.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Word Origins

January 2009; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 96 words.

[ME]

Nowadays to cope with something is to manage or deal with it effectively, but the word used to mean

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Cope

in Who Was Who

P ublished online December 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Politics; Military History; Warfare and Defence; Business Finance. 153 words.

KC 1933; TD

Born 18 Aug. 1870; o s of late Matthew Cope, JP, St Mellons, nr Cardiff; m 1900, Helen, y d of Major Alexander Shuldham, JP, DL, of...

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cope

Overview page. Subjects: Architecture.

Top course (capping) of masonry, brick, etc., usually sloping, of a chimney, gable, parapet, or wall, formed of cap-stones, copstones, copestones, or coping-stones to throw off water. Feath...

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cope

Edited by Tom Devonshire Jones, Linda Murray and Peter Murray.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Christian Art & Architecture

January 2013; p ublished online November 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Religious Subjects in Art. 179 words.

Originally a Roman outdoor cloak, it is a semicircle of heavy cloth, about 11 ft. in diameter, draped over the shoulders and reaching almost to the ground. It differed from the chasuble...

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cope

Overview page. Subjects: Christianity — Art.

A semicircular cloak worn at certain liturgical functions in the W. Church when the chasuble is not used. In the Middle Ages it was widely used as a ceremonial choir habit by communities on...

See overview in Oxford Index

Cope's Rule

Michael J. Benton.

in Encyclopedia of Evolution

January 2002; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Evolutionary Biology. 809 words.

Cope's rule is the observation that animal groups tend to evolve through time toward larger body size. Edward Drinker Cope

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Cope’s rule

Edited by Michael Allaby.

in A Dictionary of Zoology

January 2014; p ublished online May 2014 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Zoology and Animal Sciences. 125 words.

In 1871, the American palaeontologist Edward Drinker Cope (1840–97) noted a phylogenetic trend towards increased body size

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Cope’s rule

Michael Allaby.

in A Dictionary of Ecology

P ublished online September 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Ecology and Conservation. 149 words.

In 1871, the American palaeontologist Edward Drinker Cope (1840–97) noted a phylogenetic trend towards increased body size in many animal groups, including mammals, reptiles, arthropods,...

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Cope, Alan

in Who's Who

P ublished online December 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Politics. 107 words.

CPFA, FCCA

Born 8 Oct. 1946; s of John William Cope and Bertha Cope; m 1969, Gillian Mary Kirk; two null...

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Cope's rule

Edited by MICHAEL ALLABY.

in A Dictionary of Earth Sciences

January 2008; p ublished online January 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Earth Sciences and Geography. 128 words.

In 1871, the American palaeontologist Edward Drinker Cope (1840–97) noted a phylogenetic trend towards increased body size

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