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cutwater

Overview page. Subjects: Warfare and Defence.

ˈkǝtˌwôṯǝr; -ˌwäṯǝr

n.

1 the forward edge of a ship's prow.

2 a wedge-shaped projection on the pier of a bridge, which divides the flow...

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cut-water <i>n.</i>

Jonathon Green.

in Green's Dictionary of Slang

January 2010; p ublished online January 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 91 words.

the nose.

1848Ned BuntlineMysteries and Miseries of N.Y. I 34: He has had his cut-water staved

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cutwater

Overview page. Subjects: Warfare and Defence.

ˈkǝtˌwôṯǝr; -ˌwäṯǝr

n.

1 the forward edge of a ship's prow.

2 a wedge-shaped projection on the pier of a bridge, which divides the flow...

See overview in Oxford Index

cutwater

Christopher Gorse, David Johnston and Martin Pritchard.

in A Dictionary of Construction, Surveying and Civil Engineering

January 2012; p ublished online January 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Engineering and Technology. 22 words.

The pointed projection at the base of a bridge pier, shaped to allow the water to part around the base.

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cutwater

Edited by I. C. B. Dear and Peter Kemp.

in The Oxford Companion to Ships and the Sea

January 2006; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Maritime History. 18 words.

the forward part of a ship's stem around the waterline where the bobstay is attached. Jeremy Lines

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cutwater

in The Oxford Essential Dictionary of the U.S. Military

January 2001; p ublished online January 2002 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Military History. 37 words.

n.

1 the forward edge of a ship's prow.

2 a wedge-shaped projection on the pier of a bridge, which

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cut-water

Overview page. Subjects: Architecture.

Starling, or sharply pointed bridge-pier to reduce the pressure on it when a river is in flood.

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cut-water

James Stevens Curl.

in A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture

January 2006; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Architecture. 19 words.

Starling, or sharply pointed bridge-pier to reduce the pressure on it when a river is in flood.

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bobstay

Edited by I. C. B. Dear and Peter Kemp.

in The Oxford Companion to Ships and the Sea

January 2006; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Maritime History. 104 words.

a chain or heavy wire rigging running from the end of the bowsprit to the ship's stem or cutwater.

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starling

James Stevens Curl.

in A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture

January 2006; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Architecture. 32 words.

1 Protective piles round the piers of a river-bridge, or a pointed projection of the pier called cut-water.

2

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starling

Overview page. Subjects: Architecture.

1 Protective piles round the piers of a river-bridge, or a pointed projection of the pier called cut-water.

2 Breakwater formed of piles driven closely...

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stem

Overview page. Subjects: Maritime History — Warfare and Defence.

1 The foremost timber or steel member forming the bow of a vessel joined at the bottom to the keel either by scarfing, in the case of wood, or riveting or welding in the case...

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Infectious Diseases on Cruise Ships

Arézou Minooee and Leland S. Rickman.

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

August 1999; p ublished online August 1999 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Infectious Diseases; Immunology; Public Health and Epidemiology; Microbiology. 0 words.

They set up the mast again and spread on it the white sails, and the wind blew into the middle of the sail, and at the cutwater a blue wave rose and sang strongly as the ship went onward....

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bobstay

Overview page. Subjects: Maritime History — Warfare and Defence.

A chain or heavy wire rigging running from the end of the bowsprit to the ship's stem or cutwater. Particularly heavy rigging was required in this position since the fore-topmast in sailing...

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spur

Overview page. Subjects: Architecture.

1 Short horizontal timber, one end fixed to a cruck blade about a third of the height of the blade, and the other fixed to a cruck-stud, to carry the wall-plate.

null...

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