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fever

Overview page. Subjects: Sports and Exercise Medicine.

An increase in body temperature as a result of infection. See endogenous pyrogen.

See overview in Oxford Index

fever

Julia Cresswell.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Word Origins

January 2009; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 99 words.

[OE]

Fever has been with us since Anglo-Saxon times, when we borrowed the word from Latin febris. A fever

fever

Michael Kent.

in Food and Fitness: A Dictionary of Diet and Exercise

January 1997; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Cookery, Food, and Drink. 131 words.

A condition in which the body core temperature is higher than normal (oral temperature more than 37°C). Fever is usually

fever

Michael Kent.

in Food and Fitness: A Dictionary of Diet and Exercise

P ublished online November 2016 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Cookery, Food, and Drink. 131 words.

A condition in which the body core temperature is higher than normal (oral temperature more than 37°C). Fever is usually

fever

Elizabeth Malcolm.

in The Oxford Companion to Irish History

January 2002; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Regional and National History. 232 words.

is an ill‐defined term covering a variety of disorders, including, among others, typhus, typhoid, and relapsing fever. By the 18th

Fever

Emma Wall and Graham Cooke.

in Diagnosis and Treatment in Internal Medicine

August 2018; p ublished online August 2018 .

Chapter. Subjects: Clinical Medicine. 1646 words.

Fever is a rise in core body temperature, which is measured at the tympanic membrane, of greater than 37.8°C and which is one standard deviation beyond the upper limit of the normal range....

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Fever

M. Estée Török, Fiona J. Cooke and Ed Moran.

in Oxford Handbook of Infectious Diseases and Microbiology

December 2016; p ublished online November 2016 .

Chapter. Subjects: Infectious Diseases; Medical Microbiology and Virology. 3062 words.

This chapter covers sepsis syndromes (characterized by systemic inflammation), pyrexia of unknown origin (including nosocomial pyrexia of unknown origin, immune-deficient pyrexia of unknown...

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fever

Michael Kent.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine

January 2006; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Sports and Exercise Medicine. 149 words.

A condition in which the core temperature is higher than normal (i.e. oral temperature more than 37 °C and rectal temperature more than 37.2 °C). Fever is usually due to an infection, but...

Fever

Rittik Chaudhuri.

in Acute Care Casebook

November 2018; p ublished online December 2018 .

Chapter. Subjects: Emergency Medicine. 1433 words.

The workup of fever is highly dependent on history and physical examination, especially in the setting or recent travel or insect bite. In the case of a definite tick bite, consider Lyme...

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Fever

Sarah Morgan.

in Acute Care Casebook

November 2018; p ublished online December 2018 .

Chapter. Subjects: Emergency Medicine. 1145 words.

This chapter focuses on evaluation of a patient in the intensive care unit who develops fever in the setting of an indwelling central line and urinary catheter. Focus is on the development...

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shimamushi fever

Overview page. Subjects: Medicine and Health.

An acute fever (scrub typhus, flood fever, Japanese river fever, tsutsugamushi fever) caused by Rickettsia tsutsugamushi, transmitted by the bite of an infected larval mite (chigger) Leptot...

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traumatic fever

Overview page. Subjects: Medicine and Health.

A fever resulting from a serious injury.

See overview in Oxford Index

enteric fever

Overview page. Subjects: Public Health and Epidemiology.

An obsolete name for typhoid fever.

See overview in Oxford Index

shimamushi fever

John Lackie.

in A Dictionary of Biomedicine

January 2010; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Clinical Medicine. 30 words.

An acute fever (scrub typhus, flood fever, Japanese river fever, tsutsugamushi fever) caused by Rickettsia tsutsugamushi, transmitted by the bite of an infected larval mite (chigger) ...

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enteric fever

Edited by John M. Last.

in A Dictionary of Public Health

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Public Health and Epidemiology. 8 words.

An obsolete name for typhoid fever.

enteric fever

Miquel Porta.

Edited by John M. Last.

in A Dictionary of Public Health

P ublished online May 2018 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Medicine and Health; Public Health and Epidemiology. 9 words.

An obsolete name for *typhoid fever.

traumatic fever

in Concise Medical Dictionary

January 2010; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Medicine and Health. 9 words.

a fever resulting from a serious injury.

traumatic fever

Edited by Elizabeth Martin.

in Concise Medical Dictionary

January 2015; p ublished online September 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Medicine and Health. 9 words.

a fever resulting from a serious injury.

intermittent fever

Overview page. Subjects: Medicine and Health.

A fever that rises, subsides, then returns again. See malaria.

See overview in Oxford Index

intermittent fever

in Concise Medical Dictionary

January 2010; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Medicine and Health. 12 words.

a fever that rises, subsides, then returns again. See malaria.

intermittent fever

Edited by Elizabeth Martin.

in Concise Medical Dictionary

January 2015; p ublished online September 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Medicine and Health. 12 words.

a fever that rises, subsides, then returns again. See malaria.