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horror

Overview page. Subjects: Literature.

And fantasy have been with us, in one form or another, for as long as literature has existed. M. Shelley's Frankenstein (1818), R. L. Stevenson's The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde...

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horror

Edited by John Ayto.

in Oxford Dictionary of English Idioms

January 2009; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 5 words.

shock horror: see shock.

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horror

Julia Cresswell.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Word Origins

January 2009; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 45 words.

[ME]

The Latin word horror was formed from horrere, meaning ‘to stand on end’ (referring to hair), and ‘to

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horror

Edited by Dinah Birch and Katy Hooper.

in The Concise Oxford Companion to English Literature

January 2012; p ublished online May 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (British and Irish). 346 words.

The horror/*fantasy tradition goes back to the monster in *Beowulf dating from the 10th century, and beyond to the bloody visions of ...

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horror

Edited by Dinah Birch.

in The Oxford Companion to English Literature

January 2009; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (British and Irish). 647 words.

Horror and the supernatural or ‘weird’ tale have been with us, in one form or another, for as long as literature has existed. ...

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horror

Overview page. Subjects: Literature.

And fantasy have been with us, in one form or another, for as long as literature has existed. M. Shelley's Frankenstein (1818), R. L. Stevenson's The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde...

See overview in Oxford Index

O horror! horror! horror!

Andrew J. Power.

in The Oxford Handbook of Shakespearean Tragedy

August 2016; p ublished online November 2016 .

Article. Subjects: Shakespeare Studies and Criticism. 7903 words.

This chapter examines some of the cultural and literary influences that helped to shape Shakespeare’s play, looking at several of the ways that he uses intertexts to help generate a...

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Real Horror

Robert C. Solomon.

in In Defense of Sentimentality

September 2004; p ublished online November 2004 .

Chapter. Subjects: Philosophy of Mind. 11415 words.

Horror is not the same as fear, and while fear contains an essential action tendency horror does not. And while we can enjoy fear (as Aristotle argued in our viewing of tragic theater)...

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body horror

Annette Kuhn and Guy Westwell.

in A Dictionary of Film Studies

January 2012; p ublished online December 2012 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Film. 391 words.

A contemporary variant of the *horror film with a particular focus on human bodies that are subject to torture,

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horror stories

Sandra Kemp, Charlotte Mitchell and David Trotter.

in The Oxford Companion to Edwardian Fiction

January 1997; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (20th Century onwards). 490 words.

By the end of the nineteenth century the tale of supernatural horror had begun to fragment into different genres or

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Shock, horror

Edited by John Ayto and Ian Crofton.

in Brewer's Dictionary of Modern Phrase & Fable

January 2009; p ublished online January 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 58 words.

An ironic exclamation made in response to something that supposedly shocks. ‘Shock-horror’ headlines are sensationalistic banner headlines, as typically found

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Horror Stories

Kimberley Reynolds.

in The Oxford Encyclopedia of Children's Literature

January 2006; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Children's Literature Studies. 522 words.

The genre of horror stories is one that dominated late 20th-century children's publishing, making fortunes for individual writers and significant

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Pregnant Horror

Kelly Oliver.

in Knock Me Up, Knock Me Down

October 2012; p ublished online November 2015 .

Chapter. Subjects: Feminist Philosophy. 13448 words.

This chapter studies the various horror fantasies of women's role in reproduction and their reproductive choices. Pregnant horror films exhibit anxieties over women's reproductive...

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Horror Time

Anna Powell.

in Deleuze and Horror Film

March 2005; p ublished online March 2012 .

Chapter. Subjects: Film. 20871 words.

This chapter explores duration and the time-image of the horror film. The cinematic image moves across time in a complex trajectory. The apparatus of cinema manipulates and melds past,...

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horror / ~s n

David Crystal.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Original Shakespearean Pronunciation

March 2016; p ublished online October 2016 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Shakespeare Studies and Criticism. 12 words.

ˈɒrǝɹ, ˈhɒ- / -z

sp horror15 / horrors5

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The Future of Horror

Mathias Clasen.

in Why Horror Seduces

November 2017; p ublished online October 2017 .

Chapter. Subjects: Literary Theory and Cultural Studies. 6306 words.

This chapter discusses recent and future developments in horror entertainment. It argues that future horror media will give consumers access to a wider range of experiences, some of which...

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Why Horror Seduces

Mathias Clasen.

November 2017; p ublished online October 2017 .

Book. Subjects: Literary Theory and Cultural Studies. 224 pages.

This book explains the appeals and functions of horror entertainment by drawing on cutting-edge findings in the evolutionary social sciences, showing how the horror genre is a product of...

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Contemporary British Horror Cinema

Johnny Walker.

December 2015; p ublished online May 2018 .

Book. Subjects: Film. 184 pages.

Combining industrial research and primary interview material with detailed textual analysis, Contemporary British Horror Cinema looks beyond the dominant paradigms which have explained away...

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horror vacui noun phrase

Jennifer Speake and Mark LaFlaur.

in The Oxford Essential Dictionary of Foreign Terms in English

January 1999; p ublished online January 2002 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 26 words.

M19 Modern Latin (= the horror of a vacuum).

(A) fear or dislike of leaving empty spaces in an artistic

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Horror-Comedy

Rebecca Gordon.

in Cinema and Media Studies

P ublished online November 2013 .

Article. Subjects: Media Studies; Film; Radio; Television. 17123 words.

Horror-comedy is a generic hybrid that deliberately provokes an emotional shift from terror, suspense, or dread to hilarity. In comedy-horror—its relative—a playful tone predominates, but...

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Film and Horror

Lindsey Decker and Kendall R. Phillips.

in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Communication

P ublished online July 2017 .

Article. Subjects: Communication Studies. 9947 words.

The term horror film refers to a wide variety of films generally understood to focus on frightening topics like ghosts, monsters, and murder. Horror films have been consistently popular...

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