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puṇya

Overview page. Subjects: Hinduism.

(Skt.; Pāli, puñña).

The accumulation of beneficial consequence (loosely, merit) in Eastern religions, through the process of karma. In Buddhism, the transfer of puṇya to the dead...

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puṇya

Overview page. Subjects: Hinduism.

(Skt.; Pāli, puñña).

The accumulation of beneficial consequence (loosely, merit) in Eastern religions, through the process of karma. In Buddhism, the transfer of puṇya to the dead...

See overview in Oxford Index

puṇya-jñāna-saṃbhāra

Overview page. Subjects: Buddhism.

(Skt.). The accumulation of merit and awareness. According to Mahāyāna teachings, a being needs to accumulate sufficient stores of merit and awareness to progress along the path. Merit...

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puṇya-kṣetra

Overview page. Subjects: Buddhism.

(Skt.; Pāli, puñña-khetta).

A ‘field of merit’, being an individual or group that is a particularly worthy recipient of a gift. After a Buddha.the greatest field of merit is said...

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puṇya

Damien Keown.

in A Dictionary of Buddhism

January 2004; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Buddhism. 83 words.

(Skt.; Pāli, puñña).

Term meaning ‘merit’, meritorious action’, or ‘virtue’. Sometimes also used to refer to the results or potential

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puṇya

W. J. Johnson.

in A Dictionary of Hinduism

January 2009; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Hinduism. 123 words.

Religious merit accruing to the individual as the result of correct ritual and/or ethical actions (karma), on the

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Puṇya

John Bowker.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

January 2000; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Religious Studies. 38 words.

(Skt.; Pāli, puñña).

The accumulation of beneficial consequence (loosely, merit) in Eastern religions, through the process of karma

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puṇya-kṣetra

Damien Keown.

in A Dictionary of Buddhism

January 2004; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Buddhism. 71 words.

(Skt.; Pāli, puñña-khetta).

A ‘field of merit’, being an individual or group that is a particularly worthy recipient of a

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puṇya (P.)

Edited by Robert E. Buswell and David S. Lopez.

in The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism

P ublished online July 2017 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Buddhism. 186 words.

In Sanskrit, “merit,” the store of wholesome karman created by the performance of virtuous deeds, which fructify in the form

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puṇya-jñāna-saṃbhāra

Damien Keown.

in A Dictionary of Buddhism

January 2004; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Buddhism. 83 words.

(Skt.). The accumulation of merit and awareness. According to Mahāyāna teachings, a being needs to accumulate sufficient stores of merit

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Bun

Overview page. Subjects: Buddhism.

(Lao, festival).

1 A religious festival.

2 The merit (puṇya) earned through Buddhist religious practices.

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Bun

Damien Keown.

in A Dictionary of Buddhism

January 2004; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Buddhism. 18 words.

(Lao, festival).

1 A religious festival.

2 The merit (puṇya) earned through Buddhist religious practices.

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pāpa

Damien Keown.

in A Dictionary of Buddhism

January 2004; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Buddhism. 129 words.

(Skt.; Pāli, sin).

That which is evil or wrongful and leads to suffering. Pāpa is the opposite of puṇya

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preliminary practices

Damien Keown.

in A Dictionary of Buddhism

January 2004; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Buddhism. 151 words.

(Tib., sngon-‘gro).

A set of preparatory practices undertaken by adherents of Tibetan Buddhism to accumulate sufficient merit (puṇya)

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dāna

Damien Keown.

in A Dictionary of Buddhism

January 2004; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Buddhism. 68 words.

(Skt.; Pāli).

Generosity, a key Buddhist virtue which is both a source of great merit (puṇya) and also

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pattidāna (S.)

Edited by Robert E. Buswell and David S. Lopez.

in The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism

P ublished online July 2017 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Buddhism. 270 words.

In Pāli, lit. “assigned gift,” referring to merit (P. puñña, S. puṇya) that has been obtained and

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pariṇāmanā (T.)

Edited by Robert E. Buswell and David S. Lopez.

in The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism

P ublished online July 2017 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Buddhism. 173 words.

In Sanskrit, “dedication,” the practice of mentally or ritually directing the merit (puṇya) produced from a virtuous (

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Lakṣmī

John Bowker.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

January 2000; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Religious Studies. 75 words.

(Skt., ‘sign’).

In the Vedas a mark or indication, neither good nor bad unless so qualified (e.g. by puṇya if

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saṃbhāra-mārga

Overview page. Subjects: Buddhism.

(Skt.). The ‘path of accumulation’, the first of the five paths to Buddhahood (see pañca-mārga) in which one gathers the requisite accumulation of merit and awareness (puṇya-jñāna-saṃbhāra).

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dāna

Overview page. Subjects: Hinduism.

(Skt.; Pāli).

Generosity, a key Buddhist virtue which is both a source of great merit (puṇya) and also instrumental in overcoming selfishness and attachment. In Theravādin...

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prayer flag

Overview page. Subjects: Buddhism.

Associated with Tibetan Buddhism (see Tibet), these are coloured squares of cloth printed with mantras and images of Buddhist deities. They are attached to cords and hung up so that they...

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