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Punch

Overview page. Subjects: Literature.

An illustrated weekly comic periodical, founded 1841; at first a rather strongly Radical paper, gradually becoming less political. It ceased publication in 1992.

It appears that...

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punch

Edited by John Ayto.

in Oxford Dictionary of English Idioms

January 2009; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 144 words.

beat someone to the punch anticipate or forestall someone's actions.

pack a punch: see pack.

pleased (or proud)

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punch

Edited by T. F. Hoad.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

January 1996; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 38 words.

(Punch) hump-backed short grotesque male figure; principal character in the puppet-show of Punch and Judy XVIII; short fat

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punch

Tony Deverson.

in The Oxford Dictionary of New Zealandisms

January 2010; p ublished online January 2014 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 48 words.

verb (also Australian) drive (stock in a mob) vigorously. punching noun [extended use from US punch drive (cattle) by

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Punch

in The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable

January 2005; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 175 words.

a grotesque, hook-nosed humpbacked buffoon, the chief male character of the Punch and Judy show. Punch is the English variant of a stock character derived ultimately from Italian ...

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Punch

Joyce Bourne.

in A Dictionary of Opera Characters

January 2008; p ublished online January 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Opera. 55 words.

(Birtwistle: Punch and Judy). High bar. Each of his murders is preceded by a war‐cry—he kills his

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punch

Edited by John Ayto.

in An A-Z of Food and Drink

January 2002; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Cookery, Food, and Drink. 275 words.

The vogue for punch started in England in the early seventeenth century, imported by officers of the East India Company.

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PUNCH

Edited by Nigel Rees.

in Brewer's Famous Quotations

January 2006; p ublished online January 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 2627 words.

Peccavi – I have Sindh.

18 May 1844. Punch suggested that Caesar's ‘Veni, vidi, vici’ was beaten for

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punch

Timothy Darvill.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Archaeology

January 2008; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Archaeology. 100 words.

[Ar]

In flintworking a punch is generally a wooden or bone rod that directs the force applied to the top

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punch

John Ayto.

in The Diner’s Dictionary

January 2012; p ublished online January 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Cookery, Food, and Drink. 275 words.

The vogue for punch started in England in the early seventeenth century, imported by officers of the East India Company.

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Punch

in The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America

January 2012; p ublished online January 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Cookery, Food, and Drink. 942 words.

Over the centuries punch, as a beverage, has had different definitions. Since the early seventeenth century the British, particularly those

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Punch

Joseph M. Carlin.

in The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America

January 2004; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Cookery, Food, and Drink. 916 words.

Over the centuries punch, as a beverage, has had different definitions. Since the early seventeenth century the British, particularly those

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punch

Overview page. Subjects: Archaeology — Art.

[Ar]

In flintworking a punch is generally a wooden or bone rod that directs the force applied to the top of the punch with a hammer to the desired point on the flint core in a very...

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punch

Michael Clarke.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Art Terms

January 2010; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Theory of Art. 63 words.

A tool used to stamp designs on surfaces such as *gilded *gesso panels and leather articles. A punch is usually a slender, tapering, small rod of steel or ...

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punch

Julia Cresswell.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Word Origins

January 2009; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 190 words.

[LME]

The punch that means ‘to strike’ was first used in the sense ‘to puncture or prod’, which is probably

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punch

Overview page.

Punch above one's weight engage in an activity or contest perceived as being beyond one's capacity or abilities. The allusion is to boxing, in which contests are arranged between opponents...

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Punch

in Oxford Art Online

P ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Painting; Art Techniques and Principles. 572 words.

Small metal tool, usually of iron or steel, tapering to a point at one end, which, when it is struck firmly from the other end, produces an indentation (circular or intricately shaped)...

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punch

in The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable

January 2005; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 36 words.

punch above one's weight engage in an activity or contest perceived as being beyond one's capacity or abilities. The allusion is to boxing, in which contests are arranged between opponents...

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Punch

Overview page. Subjects: Opera — Literature.

(Birtwistle: Punch and Judy). High bar. Each of his murders is preceded by a war‐cry—he kills his wife, Judy, their baby, the Doctor and the Lawyer. His love for Pretty Polly is rejected...

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Punch

Edited by Dinah Birch and Katy Hooper.

in The Concise Oxford Companion to English Literature

January 2012; p ublished online May 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (British and Irish). 58 words.

The principal character in the most famous of English puppet plays, distinguished by humped back, hooked nose, and a tendency to beat his wife Judy and other victims: he is accompanied by...

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Punch

Edited by Dinah Birch.

in The Oxford Companion to English Literature

January 2009; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (British and Irish). 60 words.

The principal character in the most famous of English puppet plays, distinguished by humped back, hooked nose, and a tendency to beat his wife Judy and other victims: he is accompanied by...

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