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quasar

Overview page. Subjects: Astronomy and Astrophysics.

An object with a high redshift which looks like a star, but is actually the very luminous active nucleus of a distant galaxy. The name is a contraction of quasi-stellar, from their...

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quasar

in New Oxford Rhyming Dictionary

January 2012; p ublished online May 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 4 words.

César, quasar

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quasar

in Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 4 words.

César, quasar

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quasar

E. Julius Dasch.

in A Dictionary of Space Exploration

January 2005; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Astronomy and Astrophysics. 111 words.

One of the most distant extragalactic objects known, discovered in 1963. Quasars appear starlike, but each emits more energy

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quasars

Andrew Liddle and Jon Loveday.

in The Oxford Companion to Cosmology

January 2008; p ublished online January 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Astronomy and Astrophysics. 400 words.

Quasars are a sub-category of active galactic nuclei (AGN), and are amongst the most powerful known sources of

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quasar

Overview page. Subjects: Astronomy and Astrophysics.

An object with a high redshift which looks like a star, but is actually the very luminous active nucleus of a distant galaxy. The name is a contraction of quasi-stellar, from their...

See overview in Oxford Index

quasar

Edited by Stephen O'Meara and E. Julius Dasch.

in A Dictionary of Space Exploration

P ublished online July 2018 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Astronomy and Astrophysics. 117 words.

One of the most distant extragalactic objects known, discovered in 1963. Quasars appear starlike, but each emits more energy than 100 giant galaxies. They are thought to be at the centre of...

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OVV quasar

Overview page. Subjects: Astronomy and Astrophysics.

Abbr. for optically violently variable quasar. See Blazar.

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OVV quasar

Ian Ridpath.

in A Dictionary of Astronomy

January 2012; p ublished online January 2012 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Astronomy and Astrophysics. 10 words.

Abbr. for optically violently variable quasar. See Blazar.

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OVV quasar

Edited by Ian Ridpath.

in A Dictionary of Astronomy

P ublished online February 2018 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Astronomy and Astrophysics; Astronomical Instrumentation, Methods, and Techniques; Galaxies. 10 words.

Abbr. for optically violently variable quasar. See Blazar.

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double quasar

Ian Ridpath.

in A Dictionary of Astronomy

January 2012; p ublished online January 2012 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Astronomy and Astrophysics. 121 words.

A quasar whose image has been split into two by the *gravitational lens effect of a massive galaxy or

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double quasar

Edited by Ian Ridpath.

in A Dictionary of Astronomy

P ublished online February 2018 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Astronomy and Astrophysics; Astronomical Instrumentation, Methods, and Techniques; Galaxies. 122 words.

A quasar whose image has been split into two by the *gravitational lens effect of a massive galaxy or cluster of galaxies along the line of sight. The first example found, 0957+561 A and B,...

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quasar surveys

Andrew Liddle and Jon Loveday.

in The Oxford Companion to Cosmology

January 2008; p ublished online January 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Astronomy and Astrophysics. 348 words.

The first quasars were discovered in the 1950s and 1960s as powerful sources detected in the radio part of the

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Binary quasars

Daniel J. Mortlock, Rachel L. Webster and Paul J. Francis.

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

November 1999; p ublished online November 1999 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Astronomy and Astrophysics. 7843 words.

Quasar pairs are either physically distinct binary quasars or the result of gravitational lensing. The majority of known pairs are in fact lenses, with a few confirmed as binaries, leaving...

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quasar surveys

Overview page. Subjects: Astronomy and Astrophysics.

The first quasars were discovered in the 1950s and 1960s as powerful sources detected in the radio part of the electromagnetic spectrum (at wavelengths longer than about 10 cm). The ...

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See overview in Oxford Index

double quasar

Overview page. Subjects: Astronomy and Astrophysics.

A quasar whose image has been split into two by the gravitational lens effect of a massive galaxy or cluster of galaxies along the line of sight. The first example found, 0957+561 A and B,...

See overview in Oxford Index

quasar absorption systems

Andrew Liddle and Jon Loveday.

in The Oxford Companion to Cosmology

January 2008; p ublished online January 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Astronomy and Astrophysics. 116 words.

The name ‘quasar absorption system’ (sometimes called QSO absorption line system, or QSOALS for short) is a bit of a

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pulsars and quasars

Norriss S. Hetherington.

in The Oxford Companion to the History of Modern Science

January 2003; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of Science and Technology. 523 words.

Exotic astronomical objects were first detected in the 1960s by their radio emissions, though most quasars (quasi-stellar radio sources) are

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quasar absorption systems

Overview page. Subjects: Astronomy and Astrophysics.

The name ‘quasar absorption system’ (sometimes called QSO absorption line system, or QSOALS for short) is a bit of a misnomer, since these are clouds of gas that lie between ...

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pulsars and quasars

Overview page. Subjects: Science and Mathematics.

Exotic astronomical objects were first detected in the 1960s by their radio emissions, though most quasars (quasi-stellar radio sources) are radio quiet. Pulsars are pulsating radio sources.

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The quasar enigma

Malcolm Longair.

in A Century of Nature

December 2003; p ublished online May 2013 .

Chapter. Subjects: History of Science and Technology. 3847 words.

The quasar story goes back to May 1933, when radio astronomy was born. Surveys of the radio sky had revealed a population of extragalactic radio sources, and a few of them were associated...

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