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Rhythm

Overview page. Subjects: Literature.

(1911–13,

superseded 1913 by the Blue Review), a periodical edited by J. M. Murry, with M. Sadleir and K. Mansfield. Murry conceived it as ‘The Yellow Book of the modern movement’;...

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Rhythm

in The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics

P ublished online August 2017 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (Poetry and Poets). 3099 words.

I. Features of Rhythm II. Rhythm versus Meter III. Analysis of Rhythm

Although when it was first used in Eng.,

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Rhythm

Aniruddh D. Patel.

in Music, Language, and the Brain

December 2007; p ublished online March 2012 .

Chapter. Subjects: Neuroscience. 35084 words.

Although there have already been several studies that investigated how rhythm is integrated with the domains of both music and speech, there have rarely been comparative studies regarding...

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rhythms

David McFarland.

in A Dictionary of Animal Behaviour

P ublished online January 2014 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Animal Behaviour and Behavioural Ecology. 228 words.

Cyclic aspects of behaviour. The period of a behavioural rhythm may be as long as a year or as short

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rhythms

David McFarland.

in A Dictionary of Animal Behaviour

January 2006; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Animal Behaviour and Behavioural Ecology. 228 words.

Cyclic aspects of behaviour. The period of a behavioural rhythm may be as long as a year, or as short

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rhythm

Michael Kent.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine

January 2006; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Sports and Exercise Medicine. 67 words.

Any sequence of regularly recurring functions or events, such as certain physiological processes (e.g. see circadian rhythm). Locomotory movements may also have a rhythm as in the regular...

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Rhythm

Lexi Eikelboom.

September 2018; p ublished online October 2018 .

Book. Subjects: Philosophy of Religion. 272 pages.

This book argues that, as a pervasive dimension of human existence with theological implications, rhythm ought to be considered a category of theological significance. Philosophers and...

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rhythm

Overview page. Subjects: Sports and Exercise Medicine — Zoology and Animal Sciences.

Any sequence of regularly recurring functions or events, such as certain physiological processes (e.g. see circadian rhythm). Locomotory movements may also have a rhythm as in the regular...

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Rhythm

Marie-Noël Colette.

in Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages

January 2002; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500). 526 words.

In the strict sense, rhythm is the temporal organisation underlying all musical expression.

The music transmitted in writing between the

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Rhythm

Caroline Levine.

in Forms

January 2015; p ublished online October 2017 .

Chapter. Subjects: Literary Theory and Cultural Studies. 13961 words.

This chapter makes a threefold argument for paying a richer and more detailed attention to rhythms, both social and aesthetic. It starts with the importance of attending to the temporal...

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Rhythm

Justin London.

in Oxford Music Online

January 2001; p ublished online January 2001 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Musical Structures, Styles, and Techniques. 29181 words.

(from Gk. rhythmos; Lat. rhythmus; Fr. rythme; Ger. Rhythmus; 16th-, 17th-century Eng. rithme)

Generically, a ‘movement marked by the regulated succession of strong or weak...

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Rhythm

Donna Louise Gunn.

in Discoveries from the Fortepiano

December 2015; p ublished online December 2015 .

Chapter. Subjects: Applied Music. 7802 words.

The chapter explains implied meanings inherent in eighteenth-century rhythmic notation. The elements of affekt, tempo, meter (including the downbeat), rhetoric and pathos, phrase structure,...

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rhythm

Edited by Joyce Bourne.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Music

January 2012; p ublished online May 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Music. 773 words.

In the full sense of the word everything pertaining to the time aspect of music as distinct from the aspect of pitch, incl. the effects of beats, accents, measures, grouping of notes into...

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Rhythms

Elisabeth Le Guin.

in The Tonadilla in Performance

November 2013; p ublished online May 2014 .

Chapter. Subjects: Musicology and Music History. 18239 words.

The reductive and often stereotypical idea of “Spanish rhythm” has a long history, dating back at least five hundred years. On what realities might this idea be based? This chapter proposes...

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rhythm

in The Oxford Companion to Music

P ublished online January 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Music. 2407 words.

Rhythm in music is normally felt to embrace everything to do with both time and motion—with the organization of musical events in time, however flexible in metre and tempo, irregular in...

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rhythm

Overview page. Subjects: Music.

Covers everything pertaining to the time aspect of mus. as distinct from the aspect of pitch, i.e. it incl. the effects of beats, accents, measures, grouping of notes into beats, grouping...

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Rhythm

Michael D. Hurley.

in The Oxford Handbook of Victorian Poetry

October 2013; p ublished online December 2013 .

Article. Subjects: Literature; Literary Studies (19th Century). 8922 words.

Late nineteenth-century verse is marked by an intense, restless and self-conscious preoccupation with rhythm. To a degree unprecedented in English literary history, Victorian poets seek to...

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Sprung Rhythm

in The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics

P ublished online August 2017 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (Poetry and Poets). 917 words.

G. M. Hopkins coined the term sprung rhythm to characterize the poetic rhythm that he used first in his great

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infradian rhythm

Overview page. Subjects: Psychology.

Any biological rhythm with a period of less than a day. See alpha wave, basic rest-activity cycle, beta wave, delta wave, gamma wave, sensorimotor rhythm, theta wave. See also biological...

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circadian rhythms

David McFarland.

in A Dictionary of Animal Behaviour

January 2006; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Animal Behaviour and Behavioural Ecology. 29 words.

Endogenous rhythms in physiology and behaviour, that usually have (in isolation) slightly less than a 24-hour periodicity. The endogenous rhythm

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circadian rhythm

Michael Kent.

in Food and Fitness: A Dictionary of Diet and Exercise

January 1997; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Cookery, Food, and Drink. 476 words.

Circadian rhythms are cyclical changes that recur regularly over an approximately 24-hour cycle. They are a type of biological rhythm

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