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shaman

Overview page. Subjects: Religion.

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An individual believed to have special magical powers; a sorcerer or witch doctor. A medicine man in ‘primitive’ societies, often with supernatural powers, who was capable of...

See overview in Oxford Index

shaman

Edited by T. F. Hoad.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

January 1996; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 11 words.

priest among N. Asiatic tribes. XVII. — G. schamane, Russ. shamán.

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Shamanism

David Leeming.

in A Dictionary of Asian Mythology

January 2001; p ublished online January 2002 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 307 words.

Shamanism is a religious phenomenon involving the disciplines and the practices of shamans. Although existing in various forms in

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Shamanism

David Leeming.

in The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

January 2005; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 297 words.

Shamanism is a religious phenomenon involving the disciplines and the practices of shamans. Although existing in various forms in various

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Shamanism

Rane Willerslev.

in Soul Hunters

August 2007; p ublished online May 2012 .

Chapter. Subjects: Anthropology. 9272 words.

This chapter discusses shamanism. It argues that shamanism among the Yukaghirs is to be understood as a broadly based activity practiced to various degrees by ordinary hunters, instead of...

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Shamans

David Chidester.

in Religion

April 2018; p ublished online January 2019 .

Chapter. Subjects: Religious Studies. 4281 words.

This chapter considers shamans in their circulations through colonial situations. As a characteristic feature of shamanism, mobility is evident in the shaman’s capacity to move between...

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shamanism

Edited by Craig Calhoun.

in Dictionary of the Social Sciences

January 2002; p ublished online January 2002 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Social Sciences. 78 words.

A socioreligious system in which certain individuals (shamans) are credited with powers over the physical and spiritual world, often in

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Shamanism

Theresa Ki-ja Kim.

in The International Encyclopedia of Dance

January 1998; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Dance. 704 words.

The term shaman is derived from the Tungusic s̆aman, which can be traced through the Prakrit śamana, a

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shamans

Colin Blakemore and Sheila Jennett.

in The Oxford Companion to the Body

January 2001; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Biological Sciences. 994 words.

Ethnologists since the nineteenth century have sometimes used the terms ‘shaman’, ‘medicine man’, ‘sorceror’, and ‘magician’ interchangeably to designate individuals,

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Shamanism

Nicholas J. Saunders and Alan R. Sandstrom.

in The Oxford Encyclopedia of Mesoamerican Cultures

January 2001; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of the Americas. 2536 words.

[This entry comprises two articles. The first is a discussion of the archaeological and ethnohistorical evidence for shamanism in

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Shamanism

Barbara Tedlock.

in The Oxford Encyclopedia of Women in World History

January 2008; p ublished online January 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Social and Cultural History. 1408 words.

Shamanism is the oldest spiritual healing tradition still in general use. It consists of sets of local practices rather than

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Shamanism

in Berkshire Encyclopedia of Sustainability

January 2010; p ublished online August 2016 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Science and Mathematics. 1152 words.

Although an exact definition of shamanism and shamans is difficult to arrive at, there are consistencies across cultures. Generally, shamans represent mediators between the...

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Shamanism

John Grim.

in Oxford Art Online

P ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of Art. 2699 words.

Term for the activities of shamans, religious healers and diviners in small-scale, indigenous societies. The term ‘shaman’ is derived from saman, as used by the Tungus peoples of...

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Shamanism

Donald Pollock.

in Anthropology

P ublished online October 2015 .

Article. Subjects: Anthropology; Human Evolution; Medical Anthropology; Physical Anthropology; Social and Cultural Anthropology. 10335 words.

Shamanism has been regarded as one of the world’s oldest religions as well as one of its newest; evidence of shamanic practice has been found in Paleolithic cave art, and shamanic...

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Shamanism

Donald Pollock.

in Anthropology

P ublished online October 2015 .

Article. Subjects: Anthropology; Human Evolution; Medical Anthropology; Physical Anthropology; Social and Cultural Anthropology. 10335 words.

Shamanism has been regarded as one of the world’s oldest religions as well as one of its newest; evidence of shamanic practice has been found in Paleolithic cave art, and shamanic...

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Shamanism

Neil Price.

in The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology of Ritual and Religion

October 2011; p ublished online September 2012 .

Article. Subjects: Archaeology; Historical Archaeology. 9579 words.

Shamanism has been a contested topic in the history of ritual and religious experience since the first Western observations of the phenomenon, made in Siberia by Elizabethan English...

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Shamanism

in Berkshire Encyclopedia of World History

January 2010; p ublished online August 2016 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History. 2863 words.

Shamanism is an ideology and a set of techniques or rituals that deal with communication among spirits. Shamanistic practices are attached to a system of beliefs, and therefore...

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shamanism

Overview page. Subjects: Religion.

A term, originating from Siberia, used to describe diverse religious activities in a large number of technologically simple societies. The shaman is a part-time, non-institutionalized,...

See overview in Oxford Index

Siberian Shamanism

David Leeming.

in A Dictionary of Asian Mythology

January 2001; p ublished online January 2002 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 205 words.

In Siberian myth (See Siberian entries) and religion, shamanism (See Shamanism) is an ever-present reality. Not only

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Japanese Shamanism

David Leeming.

in A Dictionary of Asian Mythology

January 2001; p ublished online January 2002 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 107 words.

In pre-Buddhist animistic (see Animism, Shinto entries) Japan, shamans (see Shamanism) had the responsibility of organizing

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Shamanism – Ecuador

Lisa Maria Madera.

in The Encyclopedia of Religion and Nature

January 2006; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Religion. 1467 words.

In Ecuador, the most common terms that people use to refer to local shamans are the Spanish words, curandero,

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