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vade mecum

Overview page. Subjects: Bibliography.

A handbook or guide that is kept constantly at hand for consultation. The phrase is Latin and means ‘go with me’; it is first used (in the early 17th century) as the title of a book.

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vade-mecum

Edited by T. F. Hoad.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

January 1996; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 29 words.

handy book of reference. XVII. — F. — modL. vade-mecum, sb. use of L. vāde mēcum go with me,

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vade mecum

Edited by Jeremy Butterfield.

in Fowler’s Dictionary of Modern English Usage

January 2015; p ublished online June 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 23 words.

(modern Latin, literally ‘go with me’), a handbook, guidebook, etc., carried constantly for ready reference. Pronounced /vɑːdɪ ˈmeɪkәm/. Plural vade mecums...

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vade-mecum noun

Jennifer Speake and Mark LaFlaur.

in The Oxford Essential Dictionary of Foreign Terms in English

January 1999; p ublished online January 2002 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 49 words.

E17 French (from modern Latin noun use of Latin vade mecum go with me).

1 E17 A small book or

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vade mecum

Overview page. Subjects: Bibliography.

A handbook or guide that is kept constantly at hand for consultation. The phrase is Latin and means ‘go with me’; it is first used (in the early 17th century) as the title of a book.

See overview in Oxford Index

Vade mecum

Edited by Susie Dent.

in Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable

January 2012; p ublished online January 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 28 words.

A pocket book, memorandum book, pocket encyclopedia, lady’s pocket companion or anything else that contains many things of daily use

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vade-mecum

Edited by Jeremy Butterfield.

in Fowler’s Concise Dictionary of Modern English Usage

January 2016; p ublished online September 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 23 words.

meaning ‘a handbook or guidebook’ (from modern Latin meaning ‘go with me’), is pronounced vah-di may-kuhm and has

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vade mecum

in New Oxford Rhyming Dictionary

January 2012; p ublished online May 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 150 words.

• amalgam • Targum • begum • Brigham • lingam • ogham • sorghum • Nahum • Belgium • dodgem

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vade mecum

in Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 150 words.

• amalgam • Targum • begum • Brigham • lingam • ogham • sorghum • Nahum • Belgium • dodgem

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vade mecum

in The Oxford Companion to the Book

January 2010; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History. 102 words.

[Lat., ‘go with me’]

A small book containing essential information. The term (now rather uncommon) implies something that could be

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vade mecum

in The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable

January 2005; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 38 words.

a handbook or guide that is kept constantly at hand for consultation. The phrase is Latin and means ‘go with me’; it is first used (in the early 17th century) as the title of a book....

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Vivaldi vade mecum

Elizabeth Roche.

in Early Music

February 2001; p ublished online February 2001 .

Journal Article. 0 words.

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vade-mecum n.

Jonathon Green.

in Green's Dictionary of Slang

January 2010; p ublished online January 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 24 words.

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Vade mecum v.

Aaron X. Fellmeth and Maurice Horwitz.

in Guide to Latin in International Law

January 2009; p ublished online January 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of Law. 93 words.

(commonly used as a n.) “Go with me.”

(1) The standard in a field.

(2) The most highly respected

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Vade-mecum

Ian J. Deary.

in Looking Down on Human Intelligence

September 2000; p ublished online January 2008 .

Chapter. Subjects: Cognitive Psychology. 11509 words.

This chapter examines theoretical and practical problems facing the researcher investigating the cognitive and biological foundations of intelligence differences.

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vade-mecum

Edited by Robert Allen.

in Pocket Fowler's Modern English Usage

January 2008; p ublished online January 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 23 words.

meaning ‘a handbook or guidebook’ (from modern Latin meaning ‘go with me’), is pronounced vah-di may-kǝm and has

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Toward the Policy Maker’s Vade Mecum

Atish R. Ghosh, Jonathan D. Ostry and Mahvash S. Qureshi.

in Taming the Tide of Capital Flows

January 2018; p ublished online September 2018 .

Chapter. Subjects: Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics. 11693 words.

This chapter provides concrete policy advice for dealing with capital inflows. In sum, once the monetary authorities have allowed the exchange rate to appreciate to a level that is not...

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Joe Miller's Jests: or The Wit's Vade-Mecum

Overview page. Subjects: Literature.

(1739),

a jest‐book by J. Mottley. The name is taken from Joseph Miller (1684–1738), an actor in the Drury Lane company, and a reputed humorist.

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Joe Miller's Jests: or The Wit's Vade‐Mecum (1739)

Edited by Margaret Drabble, Jenny Stringer and Daniel Hahn.

in The Concise Oxford Companion to English Literature

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (British and Irish). 33 words.

(1739),

a jest‐book by J. Mottley. The name is taken from Joseph Miller (1684–1738), an

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Mottley, John (1692–1750)

Edited by Margaret Drabble, Jenny Stringer and Daniel Hahn.

in The Concise Oxford Companion to English Literature

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (British and Irish). 17 words.

(1692–1750),

is remembered as having published Joe Miller's Jests: or The Wit's Vade‐Mecum (1739).

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Longanesi, Leo (1905–57)

in The Oxford Companion to the Book

January 2010; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History. 69 words.

Among other works, he wrote the notorious Vade-mecum del Perfetto Fascista (1926), containing axioms such as ‘Mussolini is

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