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The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

David Leeming

Published in print January 2005 | ISBN: 9780195156690
Published online January 2006 | e-ISBN: 9780199916481 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acref/9780195156690.001.0001
The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

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Aaron

David Leeming.

in The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

January 2005; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 75 words.

Aaron was the older brother and sometimes spokesman for the Hebrew hero Moses in the Hebrew Bible (Torah).

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Abandonment

David Leeming.

in The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

January 2005; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 91 words.

An important stage of the universal hero myth or monomyth is that of the abandonment of the infant hero to

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Abduction

David Leeming.

in The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

January 2005; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 185 words.

The abduction motif in myth usually involves the malicious capture of a girl or young woman by an evil force

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Abraham

David Leeming.

in The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

January 2005; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 1061 words.

Abraham or Avraham (at first Abram, or Ibrahim in Arabic) is a central figure in Hebrew mythology as developed in

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Abuk

David Leeming.

in The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

January 2005; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 111 words.

The Dinka people of Sudan in Africa have a story of the first parents that is reminiscent of the story

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Achaians

David Leeming.

in The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

January 2005; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 61 words.

The Achaians were Greek peoples who were believed to have been descended from the son of Hellen, who gave

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Acheron

David Leeming.

in The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

January 2005; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 38 words.

In the Greek mythology of the Homeric period, the boundary between this world and the underworld was the river named

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Achilles

David Leeming.

in The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

January 2005; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 386 words.

Achilles is the primary hero of Homer's epic the Iliad. His father was King Peleus of the Myrmidones

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Actaeon

David Leeming.

in The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

January 2005; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 56 words.

Actaeon, a grandson of King Cadmus of Thebes in Greece, was out hunting when he happened to come upon

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Acts of the Apostles

David Leeming.

in The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

January 2005; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 230 words.

Generally attributed to Luke, the Greek-speaking physician who is credited with the authorship of the third gospel of the New

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Adad

David Leeming.

in The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

January 2005; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 24 words.

Adad was perhaps the same as or a counterpart of Hadad, a Semitic weather or storm god. Adad was particularly

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Adam and Eve

David Leeming.

in The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

January 2005; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 587 words.

A central story in Hebrew mythology contained in the first chapter of the biblical book of Genesis, sacred to

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Aditi and the Adityas

David Leeming.

in The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

January 2005; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 142 words.

In Indian Vedic mythology, Aditi is “infinity,” the source of all forms of consciousness, even of the divine characteristics of

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Adityas

David Leeming.

in The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

January 2005; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 6 words.

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Admetus

David Leeming.

in The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

January 2005; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 32 words.

Apollo was forced by Zeus to serve this king of Pherae in Thessaly as a punishment for his having killed

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Adonis

David Leeming.

in The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

January 2005; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 297 words.

The best known of the Canaanite dying gods was the young spring god Adonai (“my lord”), who was particularly favored

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Adoption

David Leeming.

in The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

January 2005; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 36 words.

In the heroic monomyth, the divine child is often adopted by menials or animals after being abandoned or threatened

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Adrasteia

David Leeming.

in The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

January 2005; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 19 words.

In the Orphic tradition in Greece, Adrasteia (“Necessity”) was present with Kronos (“Time”) at the beginning of existence.

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Adrastus

David Leeming.

in The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

January 2005; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 47 words.

Adrastus, King of Argos, was the only hero of seven who survived the disastrous attempt, led by him, to place

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Advaita Vedanta

David Leeming.

in The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

January 2005; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 107 words.

One of several interpretations of Vedanta Hinduism, Advaita Vedanta was developed probably in the eighth and ninth centuries c.e. by

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