Journal Article

The concept of the eudicot shoot apical meristem as it applies to four Spiraea (Rosaceae), one Mentha (Lamiaceae) and one Euonymus (Celastraceae) cultivars based on chimeric analysis

Robert W. Korn

in Annals of Botany

Published on behalf of The Annals of Botany Company

Volume 111, issue 5, pages 887-893
Published in print May 2013 | ISSN: 0305-7364
Published online March 2013 | e-ISSN: 1095-8290 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aob/mct054
The concept of the eudicot shoot apical meristem as it applies to four Spiraea (Rosaceae), one Mentha (Lamiaceae) and one Euonymus (Celastraceae) cultivars based on chimeric analysis

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Background and Aims

Eversporting eudicots were sought to see if they behave like gymnosperms. Behaviour of eversporting gymnosperm chimeras indicates a single apical cell is present in SAM and it would be of interest to see if eudicot chimeras have the same behaviour.

Methods

Four eversporting spireas, the pineapple mint and the Silver King euonymus were inspected for the fate of the yellow (mutant)–green (wild type) chimeras.

Key Results

As with gymnosperms, unstable eudicot chimeras in the four spireas, the pineapple mint and the Silver King euonymus became stable yellow about 80 % or more of the time and 20 % or less became stable green.

Conclusions

The statistically significant preponderance of chimeric fates becoming all yellow suggests that a single apical cell resides in the yellow tunica. As with gymnosperms, descendent cells of the yellow replacement corpus cell eventually take over the corpus. Here is the first chimeric set of data to support the hypothesis of a one-celled meristem in eudicots rather than the traditional view of a muticellular meristem.

Keywords: Apical cell; chimeras; euonymus; shoot apical meristem; pineapple mint; Spiraea; spirea; Rosaceae; Mentha; Lamiaceae; Euonymus; Celastraceae

Journal Article.  5597 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Ecology and Conservation ; Evolutionary Biology ; Plant Sciences and Forestry

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