Reference Entry

Guyomard, Gérard

in Benezit Dictionary of Artists

ISBN: 9780199773787
Published online October 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780199899913 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/benz/9780199773787.article.B00081779
Guyomard, Gérard

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  • Painting
  • Installation Art, Mixed-Media, Assemblage, and Collage
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French, 20th century, male.

Born 20 November 1936, in Paris.

Painter, mixed media. Scenes with figures.

Nouvelle Figuration, Figuration Narrative.

Influenced by Pop Art, and with something distinctly European about him (although in some respects he puts one in mind of Peter Saül, among others), Gérard Guyomard has developed his own individual brand of humour, with much erotic innuendo. In what he calls his 'studio strategy', he brings together seemingly unrelated observations and actions. He sometimes refers to celebrated works from the past, and transfers elements of everyday life into unfamiliar situations. When he deals with the difficulty of interpreting a situation, which can seem like an unsolvable jigsaw puzzle, his work is reminiscent of the enigmatic sculptures of Hervé Télémaque. Unlike artists such as Rancillac or Jan Voss, who frequently vary their themes and styles, Guyomard's work displays a high degree of continuity. His compositions, which are entirely painted, are constructed in the manner of collages. The draughtsmanship is efficient and confident, and though the execution is often deliberately shaky, the vivid acrylic coloration, skilfully applied, can seem electrifying. The profusion of characters, situations and events in his art, and the graphic and pictorial means he employs to depict them, have created a uniquely personal universe that never ceases to fascinate....

Reference Entry.  1086 words. 

Subjects: Painting ; Installation Art, Mixed-Media, Assemblage, and Collage ; 20th-Century Art

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