Journal Article

Functional Connection Between Posterior Superior Temporal Gyrus and Ventrolateral Prefrontal Cortex in Human

P.C. Garell, H. Bakken, J.D.W. Greenlee, I. Volkov, R.A. Reale, H. Oya, H. Kawasaki, M.A. Howard and J.F. Brugge

in Cerebral Cortex

Volume 23, issue 10, pages 2309-2321
Published in print October 2013 | ISSN: 1047-3211
Published online August 2012 | e-ISSN: 1460-2199 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cercor/bhs220
Functional Connection Between Posterior Superior Temporal Gyrus and Ventrolateral Prefrontal Cortex in Human

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The connection between auditory fields of the temporal lobe and prefrontal cortex has been well characterized in nonhuman primates. Little is known of temporofrontal connectivity in humans, however, due largely to the fact that invasive experimental approaches used so successfully to trace anatomical pathways in laboratory animals cannot be used in humans. Instead, we used a functional tract-tracing method in 12 neurosurgical patients with multicontact electrode arrays chronically implanted over the left (n = 7) or right (n = 5) perisylvian temporal auditory cortex (area PLST) and the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) of the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) for diagnosis and treatment of medically intractable epilepsy. Area PLST was identified by the distribution of average auditory-evoked potentials obtained in response to simple and complex sounds. The same sounds evoked little if there is any activity in VLPFC. A single bipolar electrical pulse (0.2 ms, charge-balanced) applied between contacts within physiologically identified PLST resulted in polyphasic evoked potentials clustered in VLPFC, with greatest activation being in pars triangularis of the IFG. The average peak latency of the earliest negative deflection of the evoked potential on VLPFC was 13.48 ms (range: 9.0–18.5 ms), providing evidence for a rapidly conducting pathway between area PLST and VLPFC.

Keywords: auditory evoked potential; electrical stimulation; functional connectivity

Journal Article.  8285 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Neuroscience

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