Journal Article

Amounts and nutrient weights in litterfall, and their annual cycles, from a series of fertilizer experiments on pole-stage Sitka spruce

J. D. MILLER, J. M. COOPER and H. G. MILLER

in Forestry: An International Journal of Forest Research

Published on behalf of Institute of Chartered Foresters

Volume 69, issue 4, pages 289-302
Published in print January 1996 | ISSN: 0015-752X
e-ISSN: 1464-3626 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/forestry/69.4.289-a
Amounts and nutrient weights in litterfall, and their annual cycles, from a series of fertilizer experiments on pole-stage Sitka spruce

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Conservation of the Environment (Environmental Science)
  • Environmental Sustainability
  • Plant Sciences and Forestry

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Litterfall from both control and fertilized (NPK) plots was collected over a 5-year period from trees aged 25–30 in six stands of Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.) stratified by climatic zones across Scotland and northern England. In addition, soil organic matter was sampled separately as litter and humus at the outset and completion of the experiment. Annual rates of total litterfall (and needle fall) ranged from 2441 (2221) to 4454 (3965) kg−1 ha−1 a−1, with variations between sites being unrelated to either standing volumes or growth rates. The application of NPK did progressively and significantly increase the amount of needle fall at most sites although there was no correlation with growth rates. Across all sites and treatments litterfall transferred 28 kg nitrogen, 2.5 kg phosphorus, 7.6 kg potassium, 18 kg calcium and 2.3 kg magnesium ha−1 a−1 from the trees to the soil. Concentrations of most nutrients in litter were greatest in early May, but the maximum rate of litterfall, and hence rate of transfer of nutrients, occurred in late July and early August. Litter and humus accumulated at these sites ranged from 22.3 to 35.6 t ha−1 from which it was estimated that the turnover time for decomposing litter was generally 8–10 years, rising to more than 13 years at the coldest site; the assumptions behind these figures are discussed.

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Conservation of the Environment (Environmental Science) ; Environmental Sustainability ; Plant Sciences and Forestry

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content. subscribe or login to access all content.