Reference Entry

Ward, John Quincy Adams

Michele Cohen

in Oxford Art Online


Published online January 2003 | e-ISBN: 9781884446054 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/gao/9781884446054.article.T090682

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(b nr Urbana, OH, June 29, 1830; d New York, May 1, 1910).

American sculptor. He was apprenticed to the sculptor Henry Kirke Brown in Brooklyn from 1849 to 1856 and learnt to work in clay, plaster, marble, and bronze. In 1861 Ward opened his own studio in New York. His first life-size sculpture, the Indian Hunter (1866; New York, Cent. Park), was based on numerous studies and first-hand observation of the Dakota Indians and convincingly depicts a sinewy Indian youth holding back his snarling dog. The sculpture’s success brought Ward numerous commissions for outdoor portrait busts and statues. Among his most celebrated monuments are the equestrian statue of Major-Gen. George H. Thomas (1878; Washington, DC, Thomas Circle) and the grandiose monument to James Abram Garfield (1887; Washington, DC, The Mall).

Ward believed that American sculptors should depict American subjects, and he fostered a native school of sculpture. In works such as George Washington (1883; New York, Wall and Broad Streets) and his masterful ...

Reference Entry.  412 words. 

Subjects: Sculpture and Carving ; Art of the United States ; 19th-Century Art ; 20th-Century Art

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