Journal Article

Increased Thrombopoiesis and Platelet Activation in Hantavirus-Infected Patients

Anne-Marie Connolly-Andersen, Erik Sundberg, Clas Ahlm, Johan Hultdin, Maria Baudin, Johanna Larsson, Eimear Dunne, Dermot Kenny, Tomas L. Lindahl, Sofia Ramström and Sofie Nilsson

in The Journal of Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 212, issue 7, pages 1061-1069
Published in print October 2015 | ISSN: 0022-1899
Published online March 2015 | e-ISSN: 1537-6613 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jiv161
Increased Thrombopoiesis and Platelet Activation in Hantavirus-Infected Patients

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Background. Thrombocytopenia is a common finding during viral hemorrhagic fever, which includes hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS). The 2 main causes for thrombocytopenia are impaired thrombopoiesis and/or increased peripheral destruction of platelets. In addition, there is an increased intravascular coagulation risk during HFRS, which could be due to platelet activation.

Methods. Thrombopoiesis was determined by quantification of platelet counts, thrombopoietin, immature platelet fraction, and mean platelet volume during HFRS. The in vivo platelet activation was determined by quantification of soluble P-selectin (sP-selectin) and glycoprotein VI (sGPVI). The function of circulating platelets was determined by ex vivo stimulation followed by flow cytometry analysis of platelet surface-bound fibrinogen and P-selectin exposure. Intravascular coagulation during disease was determined by scoring for disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and recording thromboembolic complications.

Results. The levels of thrombopoietin, immature platelet fraction, and mean platelet volume all indicate increased thrombopoiesis during HFRS. Circulating platelets had reduced ex vivo function during disease compared to follow-up. Most interestingly, we observed significantly increased in vivo platelet activation in HFRS patients with intravascular coagulation (DIC and thromboembolic complications) as shown by sP-selectin and sGPVI levels.

Conclusions. HFRS patients have increased thrombopoiesis and platelet activation, which contributes to intravascular coagulation.

Keywords: disseminated intravascular coagulation; hantavirus; hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome; platelets; thrombosis; viral hemorrhagic fever

Journal Article.  5126 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content. subscribe or login to access all content.