Journal Article

Genetic Differentiation among Recently Diverged Delphinid Taxa Determined Using AFLP Markers

S. E. Kingston and P. E. Rosel

in Journal of Heredity

Published on behalf of American Genetic Association

Volume 95, issue 1, pages 1-10
Published in print January 2004 | ISSN: 0022-1503
Published online January 2004 | e-ISSN: 1465-7333 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jhered/esh010
Genetic Differentiation among Recently Diverged Delphinid Taxa Determined Using AFLP Markers

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In the mid-1990s, a new common dolphin species (Delphinus capensis) was defined in the northeast Pacific using morphological characters and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences. This species is sympatric with a second species, Delphinus delphis; morphological differences between the two are slight and it is clear they are closely related. Does the phenotypic distinction result from only a few important genes or from large differences between their nuclear genomes? We used amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers to broadly survey the nuclear genomes of these two species to examine the levels of nuclear divergence and genetic diversity between them. Furthermore, to create an evolutionary context in which to compare the level of interspecific divergence found between the two Delphinus taxa, we also examined two distinct morphotypes of the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus). A nonmetric multidimensional scaling analysis clearly differentiated both Delphinus species, indicating that significant nuclear genetic differentiation has arisen between the species despite their morphological similarity. However, the AFLP data indicated that the two T. truncatus morphotypes exhibit greater divergence than D. capensis and D. delphis, suggesting that they too should be considered different species.

Journal Article.  6785 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Genetics and Genomics

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