Journal Article

Shouting and Screaming: Manner and Noise Verbs in Communication

Margaret Urban and Josef Ruppenhofer

in Literary and Linguistic Computing

Published on behalf of ALLC: The European Association for Digital Humanities

Volume 16, issue 1, pages 77-97
Published in print April 2001 | ISSN: 0268-1145
Published online April 2001 | e-ISSN: 1477-4615 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/llc/16.1.77

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When a noise verb is used to indicate verbal communication, factors from both the source domain of the verb (perception) and the target domain (communication) play a role in determining the argument structure of the sentence. While the target domain supplies a syntactic structure, the source domain's semantics constrain the degree to which that syntactic structure can be exploited. This can be determined by comparing noise verbs in this use with manner-of-communication verbs, which are superficially similar, but native to communication. Data for these two classes of verbs were drawn from the British National Corpus. The data were annotated with frame-semantic markup, as described in the Berkeley FrameNet Project. We compared the presence, type of syntactic realization, and position of the semantically annotated arguments for both classes of verbs. We found that noise and manner verbs show statistically significant differences in these three areas. For instance, noise verbs are more focused on the form of the message than manner verbs: noise verbs appear more frequently with a quoted message. In addition, there are differences other than the complementation patterns: certain noise verbs are biased with respect to speakers' genders, message types, and even orthography in quoted messages.

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Subjects: Language Teaching and Learning ; Computational Linguistics ; Bibliography ; Digital Lifestyle ; Information and Communication Technologies