Article

Antinomies of the Twenty-First-Century Neobaroque: Cormac McCarthy and Demian Schopf

Monika Kaup

in The Oxford Handbook of the Baroque

ISBN: 9780190678449
Published online October 2018 | e-ISBN: 9780190678456 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780190678449.013.20
Antinomies of the Twenty-First-Century Neobaroque: Cormac McCarthy and Demian Schopf

Show Summary Details

Preview

Cormac McCarthy’s novel The Road (2006) and Chilean artist Demian Schopf’s photographic exhibits embody the Baroque’s notorious contradictory nature: the baroque is at once joyful and sad. One wing of baroque expression, with historical roots in the Catholic religious baroque, is closely associated with the melancholic contemplation of ruin, death, and catastrophe. At the other end of the spectrum, there is the Deleuzian principle of becoming-minor, the program of the rebellious consumption of tradition and of re-creating existing forms. In The Road, McCarthy memorializes post-apocalyptic ruin in a grand baroque style reminiscent of Robert Burton and Sir Thomas Browne. Conversely, Schopf’s portraits of harquebus-brandishing angels and Andean dancers in colorful costumes embodying Christian and pagan figures recover the Andean mestizo baroque, one of the major expressions of the transculturating New World baroque. McCarty’s post-apocalyptic baroque meditates on death, extinction and finitude; Schopf’s joyful baroque celebrates the creativity of culture and its evolution toward greater diversity.

Keywords: baroque; New World baroque; neobaroque; melancholy; apocalypse; novel; transculturation; visual art; decolonial

Article.  13288 words. 

Subjects: Literary Studies (1500 to 1800)

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content. subscribe or login to access all content.