Journal Article

Adaptation to the Local Environment by Modifications of the Photoperiod Response in Crops

Norihito Nakamichi

in Plant and Cell Physiology

Volume 56, issue 4, pages 594-604
Published in print April 2015 | ISSN: 0032-0781
Published online November 2014 | e-ISSN: 1471-9053 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/pcp/pcu181

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Flowering plants produce a meristem at the shoot tip where specialized tissue generates shoot apical meristems at the appropriate time to differentiate into reproductive structures, pollinate and efficiently generate seeds. The complex set of molecular and phenological events culminating in development of a flowering meristem is referred to as ‘flowering time’. Flowering time affects plant productivity because plants dedicate energy to produce flowers and seeds rather than vegetative tissue once the molecular decision to initiate flowering has been taken. Thus, initiation of flowering time is an important decision in plants, especially in annual plants including crops. Humans have introduced crops into latitudes and climate areas far from their origin or natural ecosystem, requiring in many cases modification of native flowering times. Recent molecular–genetic studies shed light on the genetic basis related to such introductions. In this review, recent progress regarding crop introductions and their genetic bases are summarized, as well as the potential of other agricultural plants to be introduced into different climatic zones.

Keywords: Circadian clock; Flowering time; Post-domestication spread

Journal Article.  7373 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Molecular Biology and Genetics ; Biotechnology ; Biochemistry ; Bioinformatics and Computational Biology ; Molecular and Cell Biology ; Plant Sciences and Forestry ; Plant Physiology

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