Journal Article

Bubble-detector measurements in the Russian segment of the International Space Station during 2009–12

M. B. Smith, S. Khulapko, H. R. Andrews, V. Arkhangelsky, H. Ing, B. J. Lewis, R. Machrafi, I. Nikolaev and V. Shurshakov

in Radiation Protection Dosimetry

Volume 163, issue 1, pages 1-13
Published in print January 2015 | ISSN: 0144-8420
Published online April 2014 | e-ISSN: 1742-3406 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/rpd/ncu053
Bubble-detector measurements in the Russian segment of the International Space Station during 2009–12

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Measurements using bubble detectors have been performed in order to characterise the neutron dose and energy spectrum in the Russian segment of the International Space Station (ISS). Experiments using bubble dosemeters and a bubble-detector spectrometer, a set of six detectors with different energy thresholds that is used to determine the neutron spectrum, were performed during the ISS-22 (2009) to ISS-33 (2012) missions. The spectrometric measurements are in good agreement with earlier data, exhibiting expected features of the neutron energy spectrum in space. Experiments using a hydrogenous radiation shield show that the neutron dose can be reduced by shielding, with a reduction similar to that determined in earlier measurements using bubble detectors. The bubble-detector data are compared with measurements performed on the ISS using other instruments and are correlated with potential influencing factors such as the ISS altitude and the solar activity. Surprisingly, these influences do not seem to have a strong effect on the neutron dose or energy spectrum inside the ISS.

Journal Article.  5889 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Nuclear Chemistry, Photochemistry, and Radiation

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